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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 240 240 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October 5th or search for October 5th in all documents.

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of cutting off Lee's communications with Richmond and of attacking that place, which was then defended by only a handful of militia. The expedition, however, failed to accomplish a single object for which ,it had been fitted out. The failure resulting, as it was alleged, from the inefficiency of one of the generals commanding, General Dix, therefore, ordered its return, and sent the troops of which it was composed to reinforce the army of General Meade, north of the Potomac. On the fifth of October, Brigadier-General Wistar was sent with a small force, aided by gunboats, to Matthew County, Virginia, to break up a rebel party known as the Confederate Volunteer Coast-Guard, who were engaged in smuggling goods across the Chesapeake from Maryland and the Eastern Shore. Most of these coastguards were absent at the time, but the expedition resulted in capturing one hundred and fifty boats and schooners, and eighty head of beef cattle. The navy has given efficient aid in all the oper
country lying between Cumberland and Clinch Rivers is laid in great desolation. We had thought we had seen the desolating effects of the war before, but through this section is the worst we have found in our travels. The people have deserted the country and towns. Some, we presume, went to the South, and some to the North. Not a lick of improvement could we see. Not a new rail or board, while we could scarcely find a roof that would turn rain, or a fence that would confine stock. October fifth, we marched within two miles of Knoxville, when we met an order from General Burnside ordering us to go into camp where we were. So after near eleven days winding our serpentine line through the dust, over mountains and through valleys, we arrived nearly in sight of Knoxville. Our march over the mountains was quite pleasant. We were highly interested with the mountain scenery; the distant mountains through the Indian summer haze, whose towering summits capped with their autumnal cap
s a people demands that we do our duty to them. They must be fed. The following extracts from official letters in my possession do but partially represent the present condition of the armies of General Bragg and Beauregard, and their gloomy prospect for future supplies: Major J. F. Cumming, who supplies General Bragg's army, writes, It is absolutely and vitally important that all the cattle that can possibly be brought here shall be brought as promptly as possible; and again, on the fifth of October, he says: I cannot too strongly urge upon you the necessity, yes, the urgent necessity, of sending forward cattle promptly. It appears that all other resources are exhausted, and that we are now dependent upon your State for beef for the very large army of General Bragg. I know you will leave no stone unturned, and I must say all is now dependent on your exertions, so far as beef is concerned. In regard to bacon, the stock is about exhausted-hence beef is our only hope. I know the p