Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October 9th or search for October 9th in all documents.

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d forces-but no general battle: October tenth and eleventh, at Robertson's River; twelfth, at Brandy Station; fourteenth, at Bristoe Station; nineteenth, at Buckland Mills; twenty-fourth, at Bealton and the Rappahannock Bridge; and on the seventh of November, on the south bank of that river. Our loss at Bristoe Station was fifty-one killed and three hundred and twenty-nine wounded. We captured five cannon,two colors,and four hundred and fifty prisoners. In the several skirmishes between the ninth and twenty-third of October, the casualties in our cavalry corps were seventy-four killed, three hundred and sixteen wounded, and eight hundred and eighty-five missing. The enemy's loss is not known, but must have been heavy, as we captured many prisoners. Troops sent out from Harper's Ferry, forced him to immediately retreat. On the seventh of November, Generals Sedgwick and French attacked the enemy at Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, capturing several redoubts, four guns, and ei
y toward the Georgia borders. The troops in Charleston are in great extremity. We look alone to you for cattle; those in Georgia are exhausted. Major Guerin, Chief Commissary of South-Carolina, wrote: We are almost entirely dependent on Florida, and it is of the last importance, at this time, that the troops here should be subsisted. Again, he says: As it is, our situation is full of danger, from want of meat, and extraordinary efforts are required to prevent disaster. And on the ninth of October, he says: We have now forty thousand troops and laborers to subsist. The supply of bacon on hand in the city is twenty thousand pounds, and the cattle furnished by this State is not one tenth of what is required. My anxieties, and apprehensions, as you may suppose, are greatly excited. Major Millen, of Savannah, on the tenth of October, says: I assure you, Major, that the stock of bacon and beef for the armies of the confederate States is now exhausted, and we must depend entirely