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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
tive that Sheridan found it difficult to protect his supply trains, and considered it impracticable to cross the mountains and move on Charlottesville, as Grant desired. He therefore retired down the Valley, plundering or burning everything in his pathway that he deemed might be of service to the Confederates. He supposed the campaign over, and advised that a large part of his force be taken elsewhere. Early followed as he retired, and though the Confederate cavalry was badly beaten on October 9th, Early continued to advance to Fisher's Hill, while Sheridan halted at Cedar Creek, and prepared to send some of his troops to Grant. Early now planned and executed one of the most daring exploits of the war. With a force of about 12,000 men he determined to attack the immensely superior and victorious forces of the enemy, relying on the very boldness and unexpectedness of the movement for success. Early properly disposed his troops, and at daybreak on October 19th Sheridan's camp was a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
tive that Sheridan found it difficult to protect his supply trains, and considered it impracticable to cross the mountains and move on Charlottesville, as Grant desired. He therefore retired down the Valley, plundering or burning everything in his pathway that he deemed might be of service to the Confederates. He supposed the campaign over, and advised that a large part of his force be taken elsewhere. Early followed as he retired, and though the Confederate cavalry was badly beaten on October 9th, Early continued to advance to Fisher's Hill, while Sheridan halted at Cedar Creek, and prepared to send some of his troops to Grant. Early now planned and executed one of the most daring exploits of the war. With a force of about 12,000 men he determined to attack the immensely superior and victorious forces of the enemy, relying on the very boldness and unexpectedness of the movement for success. Early properly disposed his troops, and at daybreak on October 19th Sheridan's camp was a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
river was crossed on the 30th, and part of the army proceeded to Lost Mountain, while another part made for Ackworth and Big Shanty and captured the garrisons at those places. Marching by way of Dallas, Van Wert and Cave Spring, the army next reached Cedartown, where the wagon train, the sick and the shoeless, with all the artillery except one battery of each battalion were left behind; while the remainder of the army proceeded to Resaca and Dalton. Stevenson's division started on the 9th of October, at noon, and the Third Maryland was the battery chosen to accompany it. It was the intention of General Stephen D. Lee, who commanded the corps, to capture the garrison at Resaca, and he made forced marches in order to take it by surprise. On the 12th it was surrounded by approaches made from the north, and its unconditional surrender demanded. The Major in command of the post refused to yield, however, and General Lee did not think it worth while to compel him, and proceeded on h