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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 197 197 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for October 10th or search for October 10th in all documents.

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uch's division. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad was now pretty thoroughly destroyed for some distance by the Rebels--neither for the first nor the last time. Gen. McClellan sent forward Gen. Williams on his left to retake Maryland Heights, which he did Sept. 20. without opposition; as Gen. Sumner, two days later, occupied Harper's Ferry. Lee soon retired to the vicinity of Bunker Hill and Winchester; whence, seeing that he was not pursued nor imperiled by McClellan, he dispatched Oct. 10. Stuart, with 1,800 cavalry, on a bold raid into Pennsylvania. Crossing the Potomac above Williamsport, Stuart pushed on rapidly to Chambersburg, where he destroyed a large amount of supplies; and, retiring as hurriedly as he came, he made a second circuit of McClellan's army, recrossing without loss into Virginia at White's Ford, below Harper's Ferry. McClellan, hearing he had gone on this raid, felt entirely confident that he could not escape destruction, and made extensive preparations
cavalry, but was at no time engaged. This reconnoissance having proved that Lee had depleted his army to reenforce Bragg in Tennessee, Gen. Meade crossed Sept. 16. the Rappahannock in force, posting himself at Culpepper Court House, throwing forward two corps to the Rapidan; which he was preparing to cross when he was ordered from Washington to detach Sept. 24. the 11th and 12th corps, under Hooker, to the aid of our army at Chattanooga. Being reenforced soon afterward, he sent Oct. 10. Gen. Buford, with his cavalry division, across the Rapidan to uncover the upper fords, preparatory to an advance of the 1st and 6th corps; but Lee at the same time crossing Robertson's river and advancing in force from Madison Court House on our right, Meade fell back Oct. 11. across the Rappahannock; our cavalry, under Pleasanton, covering the retreat, and being engaged from Culpepper Court House to Brandy Station, where Buford rejoined him,and the enemy were held in check till evening
to unite that army with a large one, which would necessarily absorb it, without having been placed under the orders of its commander but, in the recollection of this writer, such instances are rare. At all events, Burnside did not add another, but continued to diffuse his command throughout East Tennessee, until it had been beaten out very thin, and was thus exposed to be cut up in detail. Col. Foster, in the far east, after one skirmish Sept. 21. near Bristol, was sharply assailed Oct. 10. at Blue Springs by Sam Jones, whom he defeated, after two days desultory fighting; talking 150 prisoners and disabling at least that number, with a loss to our side of barely 100. Shackleford now took post at Jonesboroa, with a part of his command, under Wilcox, at Greenville, with two regiments and a battery, under Col. Israel Garrard, 7th Ohio cavalry, at Rogersville, where they were attacked Nov. 6. by 1,200 mounted men under Brig.-Gen. W. E. Jones, acting under the orders of Maj.
from Arkansas, following nearly in the track of the Rebel irruption, had struck the Mississippi at Cape Girardeau; having marched 300 miles, over bad roads, in 18 days. His men were weary, his provisions exhausted, his teams worn down; part of his cavalry dismounted, with the horses of many more lacking shoes: so Rosecrans dispatched steamboats from St. Louis to bring them to that city; whence the infantry were sent up the Missouri by water, while the cavalry, under Col. Winslow, marched Oct. 10. by land to reenforce A. J. Smith ; reaching Oct. 16. Jefferson City-by reason of tlhe low stage of water in the river--one day in advance of the infantry. Meantime, Price had, of course, seriously widened the gap between him and our cavalry, of whom Pleasanton had now assumed the immediate command. A Rebel detachment under Shelby had crossed the Missouri at Arrow Rock and advanced on Glasgow; which they took, after a fight of some hours; capturing part of Col. Harding's 43d Missouri
d been struck in the face at noon by a bullet, but refused to leave his post; Tourtelotte and Col. R. Rowell, 7th Illinois, were also among the wounded. French drew off, as Cox approached, leaving 231 dead, 411 prisoners, and 800 of his muskets behind, to attest the severity of the struggle. Hood, instructed to draw Sherman out of Georgia, moved rapidly northwest, threatening again to strike the railroad, and compelling Sherman to make a forced march of 38 miles to save Kingston. Oct. 8-10. Here he learned that Hood, after making a feint on Rome, had moved 11 miles down the Coosa and was passing that river on a pontoon-bridge: Sherman followed to Rome, Oct. 11. and dispatched thence Gen. Cox's division and Garrard's cavalry across tle Oostenaula to harass the right flank of the enemy, as he moved northward. Garrard chased a brigade of Rebel cavalry toward the Chattooga, capturing 2 guns. Hood, moving rapidly, had by this time appeared before Resaca, summoning it; but Sher