Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for October 15th or search for October 15th in all documents.

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tion of a dollar of it ever being returned. From what I knew and learned of his careful habits in money matters in the campaign of 1856 I am entirely confident that every dollar and dime lever gave was carefully and faithfully applied to the uses and purposes for which it was given. Sincerely yours, A. Campbell. The places and dates were, Ottawa, August 21; Freeport, August 27; Jonesboro, September 15; Charleston, September 18, Galesburg, October 7; Quincy, October 13; and Alton, October 15. I agree to your suggestion, wrote Douglas, that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport you shall open the discussion and speak one hour, I will follow for an hour and a half, and you can then reply for half an hour. We will alternate in like manner in each successive place. To this arrangement Lincoln on the 31st gave his consent, although, he
skilful enough to warn the people of the danger ahead and to impress them with his ability to deal properly with the situation, without in any case outlining his intended policy or revealing the forces he held in reserve. The following are extracts from Mr. Lincoln's letters written during the campaign in answer to his position with reference to the anticipated uprisings in the Southern States. They are here published for the first time: [From a letter to L. Montgomery Bond, Esq., Oct. 15, 1860.1 I certainly am in no temper and have no purpose to embitter the feelings of the South, but whether I am inclined to such a course as would in fact embitter their feelings you can better Judge by my published speeches than by anything I would say in a short letter if I were inclined now, as I am not, to define my position anew. [From a letter to Samuel Haycraft, dated, Springfield, Ill., June 4, 1860.] Like yourself I belonged to the old Whig party from its origin t