Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for October 21st or search for October 21st in all documents.

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time. Lieutenant Johnston visited the Peaks of Otter with John T. L. Preston, who later in life was of Stonewall Jackson's staff. Leaving Cherry Grove, the residence of Colonel McDowell, on the 8th of September, they traveled by carriage, passing through Fredericksburg on the 11th, and reaching Baltimore on the 14th. They spent several days in Philadelphia, in order to consult the eminent Dr. Physick; and, after visiting New York, returned to Louisville, where they arrived on the 21st of October. During their absence their youngest child had died. Mrs. Johnston says: After much traveling and fatigue I am here again. My babe is in her place of rest, and my dear grandmother Mrs. Margaret Strother Hancook, who died about this time, at a very advanced age. living long enough to bless us once more-and die. Mr. Johnston devoted the autumn and winter to the care of his invalid wife, whom he tenderly nursed through an almost painless decline. In the spring they removed to Ha
bin Schoepf, took a strong, intrenched position, known as Wild Cat, with six regiments, numbering from 3,500 to 4,000 men. Zollicoffer had 5,500 men, but believed that only two Federal regiments were at Wild Cat, not knowing that the rest of the vanguard had been concentrated there, the whole strength of which he estimated at 3,300 men. He reported to General Johnston that he threw forward two regiments and a battalion to feel the enemy. This force assaulted the Federal position on the 21st of October, but, finding it too strong to be taken, withdrew with the loss of eleven killed and forty-two wounded. Howison's History of the War. --Southern Literary messenger, 1862, p. 203. He took forty prisoners and some arms. General Schoepf reported his loss as five killed and eleven wounded. As this affair has been much exaggerated, the following brief sketch from the pen of Colonel Albert S. Marks is here given. Colonel Marks was a thoughtful and gallant officer, and has since the w