Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for October 23rd or search for October 23rd in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

eral battle: October tenth and eleventh, at Robertson's River; twelfth, at Brandy Station; fourteenth, at Bristoe Station; nineteenth, at Buckland Mills; twenty-fourth, at Bealton and the Rappahannock Bridge; and on the seventh of November, on the south bank of that river. Our loss at Bristoe Station was fifty-one killed and three hundred and twenty-nine wounded. We captured five cannon,two colors,and four hundred and fifty prisoners. In the several skirmishes between the ninth and twenty-third of October, the casualties in our cavalry corps were seventy-four killed, three hundred and sixteen wounded, and eight hundred and eighty-five missing. The enemy's loss is not known, but must have been heavy, as we captured many prisoners. Troops sent out from Harper's Ferry, forced him to immediately retreat. On the seventh of November, Generals Sedgwick and French attacked the enemy at Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, capturing several redoubts, four guns, and eight battle-flags, a
tanooga, Tennessee, and his fears that General Rosecrans would fall back to the north side of the Tennessee River. To guard further against the possibility of the Secretary's fears, I also telegraphed to Major-General Thomas, on the nineteenth of October, from Louisville, to hold Chattanooga at all hazards, that I would be there as soon as possible. To which he replied, on same date: I will hold the town till we starve. Proceeding directly to Chattanooga, I arrived there on the twenty-third of October, and found that General Thomas had, immediately on being placed in command of the department of the Cumberland, ordered the concentration of Major-General Hooker's command at Bridgeport, preparatory to securing the river and main wagon-road between that place and Brown's Ferry, immediately below Lookout Mountain. The next morning, after my arrival at Chattanooga, in company with Thomas and Brigadier-General W. F. Smith, Chief-Engineer, I made a reconnaissance of Brown's Ferry and t
Knoxville and went into camp on the north side of town, and remained here till the night of the twenty-second. During which time our regiment sent two large details to Cumberland Gap, and did as much foraging, scouting, and picket-duty as other regiments here. October twenty-second, remained in camp. Nothing of interest. At nine o'clock in the night we started on the march for Loudon. Marched till two o'clock and bivouacked till daylight, when it commenced raining very hard. October twenty-third, started on the march at daylight without breakfast, and the rain pouring down in a torrent. Marched through the rain and mud till late in the evening, when we arrived at the Loudon bridge. Went into camp as hungry, wet and muddy as we could be; but in a short time huge fires were built — coffee boiling and meat broiling, and a fog rising from the drenched clothes of the boys, while they were growing all right again. October twenty-fourth, in the morning our brigade crossed the r