Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for October 25th or search for October 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
The voyage was long and stormy, thirteen days: the Journal speaks chiefly of its discomforts; but on the second Sunday we read: X. preached a horrible sermon — stood up and mocked at philosophy in good English and bad Christianity. He failed alike of satire and of sense, and talked like a small Pharisee of two thousand years ago. Not much like the Sermon on the Mount, quoth I; not theology enough to stand examination at Andover. Bluejackets in a row, unedified, as were most of us. On October 25 the travellers landed in Boston, thankful to be again on firm land, and to see the family unit once more complete. The dear children came on board to greet us — all well, and very happy at our return. Thus ends the story, seven months of wonder and of delight. At her Club, soon after, she gave the following epitome of the trip, singing the doggerel lines to an improvised tune which matched them in absurdity:--Oh! who were the people you saw, Mrs. Howe, When you went where the Cre
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
point which I made, and wished to make, was that, our flag should only go forth on errands of justice, mercy, etc., and that once sent forth, it should not be recalled until the work whereunto it had been pledged was accomplished. This with a view to Pekin. ... September 13.... The Galveston horror A terrible storm and tidal wave which had nearly destroyed the city. was much in my mind yesterday. I could not help asking why the dear Lord allowed such dreadful loss of life. ... October 25. My last writing at this time in this dear place. The season, a very busy one, has also been a very blessed one. I cannot be thankful enough for so much calm delight — my children and grandchildren, my books and my work, although this last has caused me many anxieties. I cannot but feel as old John Forbes did when he left Naushon for the last time and went about in his blindness, touching his writing materials, etc., and saying to himself, Never again, perhaps. If it should turn out so
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
and gall, and myself to reach up a golden cup containing the love pledge of humanity. Coming home I scrawled the verses before lying down to rest. These verses are printed in At Sunset, under the title of Humanity, and at the head of chapter XI of this volume. October 9. After a week of painful anxiety I learn to-day that my screed for the Cosmopolitan is accepted. I felt so persuaded to the contrary that I delayed to open the envelope until I had read all my other letters ... October 25. Meeting of Boston Authors' Club ... Worked all the morning at sorting my letters and papers. ... Laura, Maud, and I drove out to Cambridge. I had worked hard all the morning, but had managed to put together a scrap of rhyme in welcome of Mark Twain. A candle was lit for me to read by, and afterwards M. T. jumped upon a chair and made fun, some good, some middling, for some three quarters of an hour. The effect of my one candle lighting up his curly hair was good and my rhyme was well
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
. Worked a good deal on my poem. At least thought and thought much, and altered a little. This was the poem which prefaces this chapter and which was written for the forthcoming Unitarian Convention in Boston. She had been at work on it for some time, first trying to try for it, and later hammering and polishing with great care. It came to me like a flash, she says, but had to be much thought over and corrected. And again, It was given to me something as was my Battle Hymn. . . . October 25. Wrote to a very bumptious child, thirteen years old, who proffers me her friendship and correspondence, claiming to have written poems and magazine contributions praised by noted authors. I sent her back her letter, with three or four corrections and a little advice, kindly meant, but which may not be so taken... She will probably turn and rend me, but I really felt it might do her good. November 14. Gardiner. A good meditation. The sense of God in the universe seems to be an attrib