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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 423 423 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 8 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for October 27th or search for October 27th in all documents.

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uld be expected under the circumstances; but ague, cholera, desertion, and the other discouragements incident to novitiates in garrison, kept the regiment in an unhappy and restless condition until it moved. General Johnston began by the application of a rigid discipline, and the letter of a witness mentions that six men were on the same day drummed out of the regiment with shaven heads and other marks of degradation. The preparations were urged with all possible dispatch; and, on the 27th of October, the column was put in motion for the frontier of Texas. It was a happy day for General Johnston when, mounting his splendid gray charger, he led a regiment of United States regular cavalry, nearly 800 strong, on the road toward Texas. As Texas was to be their home for some years, the families of the married officers accompanied them. General Johnston's wife and family were packed into an ambulance-wagon, and occupied a tent ten feet square during the halts. They, with the other
e of Foote, pp. 191, 192, and Confederate archives. The transport then landed the troops a few miles below, at Aurora, whence they proceeded to Murray, and threatened Paris. This movement, in conjunction with the demonstration against Columbus, exactly verified the prediction of General Johnston in his letter of December 10th. The columns, moving by the west bank of the Mississippi, advanced later. But the blow struck against Zollicoffer at this very date had also been pointed out, October 27th, by General Johnston, as probable. On their return from these January expeditions, Grant telegraphed Halleck, January 28th, from Cairo: With permission, I will take Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and establish and hold a large camp there. On the same day Foote telegraphed Halleck that Fort Henry could be carried with four iron-clad gunboats and troops to permanently occupy it, and for authority to move. On January 29th Grant wrote Halleck fully, urging an immediate advanc