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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
at the age of seventy-two. and so on. Two or three times a week, therefore, we could make an agreeable supper-party without going out of the house. . . . . The only objection to society at Washington is, that there is too much of it. Here, however, things are entirely different. It is, at this moment, a city of mourning. . . . . The first moment after our arrival we heard of General Harper's death, and the tokens of it have been before our eyes ever since. I saw him several times last November, and spent an evening at his house. He was then in remarkable health, not full and plethoric, as he used to be ten years ago, but with a very decided appearance of clear and settled health. His conversation was uncommonly rich and powerful; not very animated, but very frank, and occasionally with great choice and happiness of expression and illustration. The disease of which he died, an ossification of the great vessels of the heart, is one of those deep and obscure complaints for which
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
ice-President, 1861-64; Chairman of Committee on Appropriations for several years, and placed on almost all committees charged with important duties. He resigned from it entirely in 1864. He was Treasurer, for two or three years, of the Farm School for Boys, which his father had wished to see founded. and many other things have made such constant demands on my time, that I have been more teased than I ever was in my life, and have hardly known a quiet hour, except in A.'s room, since last November. Among other things which have much occupied and a good deal troubled me, has been my Memoir of Haven. . . . . I have written a plain and simple memoir of his life and character, in which my main object has been to show how he made himself so important to the best interests of his friends and society. Whether I have succeeded or not, I wish you were here to tell me. . . . . There are not many persons who feel about the memory of our friend as you and I do, and therefore it was necessar