hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for November or search for November in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s commissioned and equipped by the Executive and Ordnance Officer, who had reported for duty in November. He had by special order selected her battery, and was also made responsible for its efficiencof Federal troops were attempting to cut him off and surround him; this was about the middle of November. We began to fall back as rapidly as possible, leaving one evening and marching some ten or twon of country that I ever saw. We had suffered both for food and raiment; the latter part of November was very bad on us, it rained, snowed and froze the most of the time. About the 5th of DecemSecretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), General E. P. Alexander, in his admirable paper (No. 2) relative to the battle of Fredericksbs. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (1882) number, as carrying water to the wounded of the enemy at the peril of his own life was,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
with mechanics until the eve of the fight. She was badly ventilated, very uncomfortable, and very unhealthy. There was an average of fifty or sixty at the hospital, in addition to the sick-list on board. The Flag-Officer, Franklin Buchanan, was detained in Richmond in charge of an important bureau, from which he was only relieved a few days before the fight. There was no captain; the ship was commissioned and equipped by the Executive and Ordnance Officer, who had reported for duty in November. He had by special order selected her battery, and was also made responsible for its efficiency. A trial was determined upon, although the vessel was in an incomplete condition. The lower part of the shield forward was only immersed a few inches, instead of two feet as was intended; and there was but one inch of iron on the hull. The port-shutters, &c., were unfinished. The Virginia was unseaworthy, her engines were unreliable, and her draft, over twenty-two feet, prevented her fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
all back where supplies were more accessible, though possibly he left sooner than he had anticipated, owing to an authentic report that a large force of Federal troops were attempting to cut him off and surround him; this was about the middle of November. We began to fall back as rapidly as possible, leaving one evening and marching some ten or twelve miles before stopping. After passing a mile beyond Nicholas Courthouse we went into camp.. This was about 12 o'clock at night. At 4 o'clock the men were much elated on receiving such welcome tidings. They certainly had been for several months in the most rugged and seemingly forsaken section of country that I ever saw. We had suffered both for food and raiment; the latter part of November was very bad on us, it rained, snowed and froze the most of the time. About the 5th of December, 1861, my command proceeded to Dublin depot, and reached our destination on the 9th inst. In a short while, however, orders were received for Gene
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
y at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), General E. P. Alexander, in his admirable paper (No. 2) relative to the battle of Fredericksburg, says: Their advance exposed their left flank to a raking fire from the artillery on Lee's hill, which with good ammunition ought to have routeommanded the batallion at the surrender, composed of Young's, Cummings's, Mitlers, and the Macon Light Artillery. Very respectfully, N. M. Hodgkins. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (1882) number, as carrying water to the wounded of the enemy at the peril of his own life was, of course, Richard Kirkland, of South Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrote so interesting a sketch. [See Vol. 8, S. H. S. Papers, page 186.] Tw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nathan Hale of ArkansasDavid O. Dodd. (search)
y of September, 1863, the Confederate commander of this district, Major-General Sterling Price, evacuated Little Rock, and went into winter-quarters eighteen miles west of Camden, on the Ouachita river. The enemy, under Major-General Steele, occupied our capital on the afternoon of the same day, and at once established garrisons at several points on Arkansas river. The father of David O. Dodd, our hero, had refugeed with his family and effects to Texas before the fall of Little Rock. In November of that year, he sent his son David, a youth just seventeen years of age, back to Arkansas to settle up some unfinished business in Saline county, their late home, about fifteen miles southwest of Little Rock. While he knew it would be hazardous for him to venture so near the Union lines in person, he thought that there could be no risk in sending his son, who had not reached military age. Of course David could not pass the Confederate pickets on Saline river without a pass from Confedera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
r General displaying that rare self-poise and confidence which bespeaks ever a great quality—firmness of mind in war. In September, while he confronts Meade along the Rapidan, he detaches the entire corps of Longstreet, and ere Meade is aware of this weakening of his opponent's forces, Longstreet is nine hundred miles away, striking a terrible blow at Chickamauga. The year 1863 passes by without other significant event in the story of the Army of Northern Virginia. Meade indeed, once in November, deployed his lines along Mine Run in seeming overtures of battle, but quickly concluding that discretion was the better part of valor, he marched back across the Rappahannock, content with his observations. 1864—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, cold Harbor, Petersburg, Lynchburg. But as the May blossoms in 1864, we hear once more the wonted strain of spring, tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, and Grant (who had succeeded Meade), crossing the Rappahannock with 141,000 men, plunges b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
a short time. Let the quarter-master make requisition for salt for horses. General Order No. 17 prescribes the quantity of transportation to batteries and no more can be obtained. By command of Major-General Stevenson, G. A. Haywood, A. C. C. head-quarter's Rowan's battery, near Dalton, Ga., April 10th, 1864. Major,—I respectfully submit for your consideration a few facts in regard to the feed furnished the stock of this battalion. I have been in the Tennessee army since last November and can truly say during the whole of that time the stock of my command has not been half fed. In some instances the horses going for two days at a time without anything to eat. Rotten corn, half rations at that, with no fodder in December and January. Full rations of corn and one pound of fodder, sometimes, (bad at that) in February and March. I have just received a good lot of horses, which I cannot keep in condition unless I get something to feed them on. I have my horses as well gro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
op the partisan and write more in the spirit of the true soldier, and our purpose to show up hereafter some of his more glaring perversions of the truth of history. Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, in the war of the rebellion; 1861-1862. By General George H. Gordon. Boston: James R. Osgood & Co. We reserve for future review this admirably written and very interesting book which is a part of the series of which the Army of Virginia and A War Diary form a continuous history of the war. General Gordon writes with a free pen, and some of his criticisms on the blundering stupidity of political managers in Washington, acting upon the colossal incapacity of their favorites in the field, are very rich. We commend the book as well worth reading and preserving. the century keeps up its high standard of excellence, and the November number contains a very readable paper on the retreat from Richmond, and capture of President Davis, by his private secretary, Burton N. Harrison. Zzz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
John W. Daniel's superb oration, an account of the unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent Statue, a beautiful cut of the statue, and much other interesting and valuable matter concerning our grand old chief) has had a wide sale, and has met with universal and enthusiastic approval. We have some copies left which we mail for fifty cents each (regular price for a double number of our Papers), and we would advise those wishing them to order at once. Colonel H. D. Capers, as we announced in our November number, has not been authorized to act as our agent since last May. We regret that his course since that announcement compels us to advert to the matter again, and to warn our friends everywhere not to receive him as our agent, or to pay money to him on our account. The Southern Historical Society will not be responsible henceforth for any of his acts. crowded out has been the fate of quite a number of interesting and valuable articles which we had purposed putting in this number. But