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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ng South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampton Roads on transport steamboat Governor, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th of October, with the other vessels of the fleet, and continued with them, near the flag-ship Wabash, until Friday, the 1st of November. On Friday morning, about 10 o'clock, the wind began to freshen, and by 12 or 1 blew so violently that we were obliged to keep her head directly to the wind, and thereby leave the squadron, which apparently stood its course. Throughout the afternoon the gale continued to increase, though the Governor stood it well till about 4 o'clock. About this time we were struck by two or three heavy seas, which broke the port hog-brace in two places, the brace tending inward. This was immediat
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
ng South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampton Roads on transport steamboat Governor, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th of October, with the other vessels of the fleet, and continued with them, near the flag-ship Wabash, until Friday, the 1st of November. On Friday morning, about 10 o'clock, the wind began to freshen, and by 12 or 1 blew so violently that we were obliged to keep her head directly to the wind, and thereby leave the squadron, which apparently stood its course. Throughout the afternoon the gale continued to increase, though the Governor stood it well till about 4 o'clock. About this time we were struck by two or three heavy seas, which broke the port hog-brace in two places, the brace tending inward. This was immediat