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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
Hatteras. It was calculated to reach Port Royal in five days at most, but in consequence of adverse winds and a perilous storm on the day and night of the 1st of November, the fleet did not arrive at Port Royal bar until the 4th, and then only in part, for it had been almost entirely dispersed by the gale, and the vessels have , though it promised well when we sailed. But off Hatteras it blew hard; some ships got into the breakers, and two struck, but without injury, on Friday, the 1st of November. The rough weather soon increased into a gale, and we had to encounter one of great violence from the southeast, a portion of which approached to a hurricanenor, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th of October, with the other vessels of the fleet, and continued with them, near the flag-ship Wabash, until Friday, the 1st November. On Friday morning, about ten o'clock, the wind began to freshen, and by twelve or one blew so violently we were obliged to keep her head directly to the wi
to rejoice over. The Richmond Enquirer, of the 30th of October, says that a letter from Jackson's River to a gentleman in that city, written on Saturday evening, the 26th, says a report had reached that place to the effect that Gen. Floyd had attacked the Federal forces at the mouth of the Coal River, killing some five or six hundred of them, and taking a number of prisoners. Floyd is said to have lost three hundred in killed and wounded. The writer of the letter referred to does not vouch for the truth of the report, or any part of it, but says it was credited in the main at Jackson's River on Saturday. The same letter speaks of the passage of Loring's command through Lewisburgh on Wednesday, upon a forced march, to reinforce Gen. Jackson at Green briar River. This is said to have been in consequence of a despatch received by Gen. Lee from Gen. Jackson, giving an account of the movements of the enemy in the locality of the latter. --Louisville-Nashville Courier, Nov. 1.
ds, and have the honor to remain, sir, With high respect, your obedient servant, Winfield Scott. A special Cabinet council was convened on Friday morning, Nov. 1, at 9 o'clock, to take the subject into consideration. It was decided that Gen. Scott's request, under the circumstances of his advanced age and infirmities, cpon the President and attended him to the residence of General Scott. On being seated, the President read to the General the following order: On the 1st day of November, A. D. 1861, upon. his own application to the President of the United States, Brevet Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott is ordered to be placed, and hereby ed veteran, Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott, will be read by the army with profound regret: Executive mansion, Washington, Nov. 1, 1861. On the first day of November, A. D. 1861, upon his own application to the President of the United States, Brevet Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott is ordered to be placed, and hereby i
n the field, whenever it can be given. 3. All bodies of armed men acting without the authority or recognition of the Major-Gen. before named, and not legitimately connected with the armies in the field, are hereby ordered at once to disband. 4. Any violation of either of the foregoing articles shall subject the offender to the penalty of military law, according to the nature of the offence. In testimony whereof, the aforesaid John Charles Fremont, at Springfield, Mo., on the first day of November, A. D. 1861, and Major-General Sterling Price, at----, on this----day of November, A. D. 1861, have hereunto set their hands, and hereby mutually pledge their earnest efforts to the enforcement of the above articles of agreement, according to their full tenor and effect, to the best of their ability. Second.--Brig.-Gen. Samuel R. Curtis, or the officer in command at Benton barracks, is hereby authorized and empowered to represent Major-General Fremont; and Col. D. H. Arm-strong, H
he agreement aforesaid, or any of its provisions, whether implied or direct; and that I can neither issue, nor allow to be issued, the joint proclamation purporting to have been signed by yourself and Major-General John C. Fremont, on the first day of November, A. D. 1861. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. Hunter, Major-General Commanding. General Hunter to Adjutant-General Thomas. Brig.-Gen. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: General: Enclosed you will find copies of certain neganner recognize the agreement aforesaid, or any of its provisions, whether implied or direct, and that I can neither issue, nor allow to be issued, the joint proclamation purporting to have been signed by Generals Price and Fremont, on the 1st day of November, A. D. 1861. It would be, in my judgment, impolitic in the highest degree to have ratified General Fremont's negotiations, for the following, among many other, obvious reasons: The second stipulation, if acceded to, would render the
er 31.--A high wind from the southwest prevailed all night. Headway slow; making but two and a quarter miles an hour. The wind has now fallen considerably, and has changed to the west. Noon.--In the Gulf stream. Weather warm; sea smooth; progress slow — only forty-four miles south of Hatteras. Six o'clock P. M.--The afternoon has been lost in lying by, waiting for the fleet to come up. The Baltic and nine other vessels have been missed, and the Atlantic sent back for them. Friday, November 1.--The Atlantic has come back with the missing vessels. The Baltic had been aground near Hatteras. Fleet all in sight; wind high from the southeast, and considerable sea running; weather cloudy. Six o'clock. P. M.--Wind increased to a gale; sea very rough, and vessels all laboring heavily. Signalled from the Wabash to keep further off the coast. No observations for latitude to-day. Ten o'clock P. M.--Wind so high that we had to cut the hawser towing the Great Republic. Satu