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involving, as you will see, very important results to the Twenty-third Wisconsin. My description, being largely that of my own personal hazards and experience, must be taken for what it is worth in a purely military sense, as I do not pretend to give an accurate account of movements on the field, or the reasons for them. We reached Opelousas after dark, on the night of the thirty-first of October, stopping with Major-General Washburn, who received us with great kindness, and on the first of November, fell back with the whole army — the Thirteenth and Nineteenth corps--to Carrion Crow Bayou, about twelve miles. The brigade of Colonel Owen, (General Burbridge's old brigade,) in which were the troops I was assigned to pay, was at Bear's Landing, eleven miles in advance of Opelousas, and came in on another road, camping at Bayou Bourbeaux, three miles nearer Opelousas than the balance of the corps. Impatient to see the boys of the Twenty-third, I went out the same night to their camp
forces, throwing away their arms, became scattered in every direction. I pursued those that he kept together until after dark. His wounded and many prisoners and arms have fallen into our hands. My loss is about one hundred officers and men. The troops are in excellent spirits, with plenty of ammunition. Wm. W. Averill, Brigadier-General. A national account. New-Creek, West-Virginia, November 20. The brigade of General Averill left their camp at Beverly, at noon, on Saturday, November first The day was clear and warm. We marched to Huttonville, where we camped for the night. At seven o'clock Monday morning we resumed the march. The day was fine — a delightful Indian summer morning — and a march of two miles brought us to the foot of Cheat Mountain. Here are the remains of the rebel works made at the beginning of the war; and here are the marks of the battle that took place at this point. On our way up the mountain we met a family of refugees from the White Sulphur
k; put your command toward Bridgeport till you meet orders. Instantly the order was executed, and the order of march was reversed, and all columns directed to Eastport, the only place where I could cross the Tennessee. At first I only had the gunboats and coalbarge, but the two transports and ferry-boat arrived on the thirty-first October, and the work of crossing was pushed with all the vigor possible. In person I crossed, and passed to the head of the column in Florence on the first November, leaving the rear division to be conducted by General Blair, and marched to Rogersville and the Elk River. This was found to be impassable. To ferry would have consumed too much time, and to build a bridge still more, and there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville. There we crossed Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport w
chigan and One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois cavalry. The rebels, thinking we were too many for them, fell back. The companies across the river returned one at a time in the little ferry-boat till all were over. Then we straightened up and went into camp, and we do not think we ever saw a much darker night, and raining very hard, and had been all the evening. October thirty-first, our brigade moved on to Knoxville, and went into the camp we left on the night of the twenty-second. November first, at six o'clock in the morning, our brigade moved out into town, but every thing not being ready, we were ordered to return to camp and wait till twelve o'clock. At two o'clock we moved out, crossed the river on the pontoon — the same bridge we had at Loudon — marched to Rockford, a small town on Little River, and camped for the night. November second, crossed Little River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remained there till the morning of the seventh, during which time we