Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for November 2nd or search for November 2nd in all documents.

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the summer, prominent Texans at Washington had been soliciting the secretary to assign General Johnston to command the Southwestern Department. Finally, on the 1st of November, the adjutant-general informed General Johnston that the secretary had given orders to that effect, and wished to see him as soon as convenient. He was at the same time apprised, by telegram and letter, of October 30th, that General Scott desired to send him to California to take command of the Pacific coast. On November 2d General Scott addressed an official communication to the adjutant-general to that effect. When General Johnston reported to the Secretary of War, he had made up his mind, as he subsequently informed the writer, not to go to Texas. If the State seceded, and the Federal Government did not promptly accommodate the questions thus started, a collision would probably occur. In this event, General Johnston took the view that he could only surrender the charge committed to him to the author
ge army, and, to evade him, Price moved southward on the 27th of September. He skillfully eluded the enemy, and made good his retreat to Neosho, where McCulloch held himself in reserve. Most of his new recruits returned to their homes, leaving him little stronger than when he set forward. But he had gained prestige and some material advantages, and had employed a large force of the enemy. Fremont then advanced slowly, with a numerous army, as far as Springfield, where he was relieved November 2d. During General Price's operations, General Hardee had assembled six or seven thousand men, at Pocahontas, in Northeastern Arkansas. Some ineffectual attempts were made toward combined movements by this force with Price and with Pillow, who became otherwise employed. But virulent types of camp epidemics disabled his command, and nothing of importance was accomplished. Thus, General Johnston had hardly assumed command when he found the Federal armies in possession of nearly the w
d regularity in all our movements. I am, with great regard, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin. General A. S. Johnston, Bowling Green, Kentucky. The circular accompanying this letter states: 1. No unarmed troops can be accepted for a less period than during the war. 2. Unarmed troops (infantry) offered for the war are accepted by companies, battalions, or regiments, and when mustered into service are ordered into camp of instruction until equipped for the field. General Johnston, on November 2d, issued orders to all mustering-officers, and wrote to the Governors, directing them to disband the unarmed twelve months volunteers, and informed the Secretary of his action. But, on the 5th, he wrote to him to say he would suspend the order for fifteen days. This was in consequence of Governor Harris's strong hope of arming these troops. Colonel Munford, in his historical address already mentioned, sums up the consequences of Mr. Benjamin's order as follows: General Johnston
d some property, insulted some women, captured one citizen as prisoner, and returned to Smithland. He reports at Calhoun, Owensboro, and Henderson, about 3,000 Federal troops, who shift from one post to another, and when moving steal everything that they meet, and take everything valuable that they can carry. This is not an unfair sample of the reported conduct of the Federal troops on this line. Brigadier-General Tilghman, who succeeded Alcorn in command at Hopkinsville, reported, November 2d, that he was threatened by a heavy body of the enemy. He adds that he had 750 sick, and only 285 for duty. To meet a scouting-party of the enemy he raked up a battalion of 400 men, but the surgeon declared that only one-half of them were fit for duty. Tilghman described them as the poorest clad, shod, and armed body of men I ever saw, but full of enthusiasm. Four days later, Gregg reached him, under orders from General Johnston, with 749 Texans, after marches of almost unexampled speed