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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
England and France; the other two were Messrs. Eustis and McFarland, attaches to the commissioners. The Trent was one of a line of British steamers which ran regularly between Vera Cruz and Havana, thence to St. Thomas, and from there to England. The company had a contract with the British Government to carry the mails, and its steamers had ample accommodations for the passenger travel between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havana on the morning of the 7th of November, under the command of Captain Moir. Nothing of interest occurred until about noon of the 8th, when, in the narrow passage of the Old Bahama Channel, opposite the Panador Grande light, from the Trent was seen a steamer ahead, apparently waiting and showing no colors. The Trent at this time was on her legitimate voyage; she had touched at no port in the Southern Confederacy, and had held no communication with vessels coming from or going to the insurrectionary States; neither was sh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
on they must feel at seeing the ensign of the Union flying once more in the State of South Carolina, which has been the chief promoter of the wicked and unprovoked rebellion they have been called upon to suppress. S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Report of Flag-officer Dupont. United States Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 11, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to submit the following detailed account of the action of the 7th of November: From the reconnaissance of the 5th we were led to believe that the forts on Bay Point and Hilton Head were armed with more than twenty guns each, of the heaviest calibre and longest range, and were well constructed and well manned, but that the one on Hilton Head was the strongest. The distance between them is two and two-tenths nautical miles-too great to admit of their being advantageously engaged at the same time, except at long shot. I resolved, therefore, to undertake the red
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
on they must feel at seeing the ensign of the Union flying once more in the State of South Carolina, which has been the chief promoter of the wicked and unprovoked rebellion they have been called upon to suppress. S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Report of Flag-officer Dupont. United States Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 11, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to submit the following detailed account of the action of the 7th of November: From the reconnaissance of the 5th we were led to believe that the forts on Bay Point and Hilton Head were armed with more than twenty guns each, of the heaviest calibre and longest range, and were well constructed and well manned, but that the one on Hilton Head was the strongest. The distance between them is two and two-tenths nautical miles-too great to admit of their being advantageously engaged at the same time, except at long shot. I resolved, therefore, to undertake the red