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ring to supply and equip them. from the resources of the neighborhood. But lie was not to be left unmolested. Brigadier-General Nelson, who had advanced to Prestonburg with a Federal force, now pushed forward, and attacked Williams on the 8th of November. Nelson had four large regiments, a battalion, and two sections of artillery — nearly 4,000 men. Williams made a stand for time to get off his stores, which he did with little loss. A sharp fight ensued; and Williams finally fell back, havbeen taken on the day appointed. Bands and squads of the hardier and bolder spirits had assembled in arms and begun the work of bridge-burning, which was to be the first chapter in the programme of this counter-revolution. On the night of November 8th five railroad-bridges were burned: two over Chickamauga Creek, one over Hiwassee River, on the Georgia State Railroad, one on Lick Creek, and another over Holston River, on the Virginia & East Tennessee Railroad. At Strawberry Plains a single
and his men learned valuable lessons in warfare that day, which is doubtless true. Before the battle, General Polk, in the interests of humanity, had proposed an exchange of prisoners, to which General Grant made a haughty reply, that he recognized no Southern Confederacy. After the battle, however, Grant had himself to send a flag of truce to reopen the negotiations he had spurned. It is believed he ever after recognized the Confederates as belligerents. President Davis, on the 8th of November, replied to General Polk's dispatch announcing the victory of Belmont : Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully the activity and skill, courage and devotion, of the army at Belmont. J. Davis. General Johnston, in General Order No. 5, after thanks and congratulations to Generals Polk and Pillow