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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
's smoke. This was at the time when the Sumter burned the Joseph Parke near the equator. Commander Semmes heard of the presence of the Iroquois, Commander James S. Palmer, in the Caribbean Sea, soon after his arrival at Martinique, and made haste to get away from that place before he should be blockaded by the Federal steamer. The Iroquois was superior in every respect to the Sumter, and Semmes had not the slightest idea of getting within range of her guns, if he could help it. On November 13, the Sumter left Port de France and anchored off St. Pierre, and a day or two later the Iroquois appeared off the harbor, and sent a boat ashore to the United States consul, after which she steamed outside and kept up a steady blockade until the authorities at Martinique called Captain Palmer's attention to the fact that he was violating the sanctity of neutral waters, and requested him to retire beyond the marine league. The manoeuvring on the part of Semmes to get to sea, and of Palmer