Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 14th or search for November 14th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

ortation. In the mean time, reconnoissances were made, and plans matured for operations. Despatches were sent to Sherman, informing him of the movement of Longstreet, and the necessity of his immediate presence at Chattanooga. On the fourteenth of November, I telegraphed to Burnside as follows: Your despatch and Dana's just received. Being there, you can tell better how to resist Longstreet's attack than I can direct. With your showing, you had better give up Kingston at the last ms necessary to a successful dislodgment of the enemy. Guerrillas having become somewhat troublesome to the north-east of McMinnville and east of the Caney Fork of the Cumberland, Brigadier-General Elliott, Chief of Cavalry, was ordered, November fourteenth, to establish his headquarters, with the First division of cavalry, at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh repor
hed to Maryville; went into camp and remained there till the morning of the seventh, during which time we scoured the country as far down as Little Tennessee River, where Lieutenant McAdams, of the First Kentucky cavalry, gained a glorious victory by drowning, killing, capturing, and completely routing twice his own number. On the morning of the seventh, General Sanders's cavalry corps fell back across Little River to Rockford, where we remained till the morning of the fourteenth. November fourteenth, early in the morning, the rebels made a dash on the pickets, and captured part of the Eleventh Kentucky cavalry. They soon began to press our lines all along the river with a heavy force — Wheeler's and Forrest's. About nine o'clock General Sanders ordered our forces to fall back. We fell back to Stock Creek, skirmishing all day. In the evening our regiment was put on picket, extending from Frenche's bridge, across Stock Creek, on the Martin Gap road, along the creek to its mouth,