Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 16th or search for November 16th in all documents.

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nants. Our loss, three men slightly wounded and eight horses killed. He reports the enemy four hundred strong, and his force one hundred and twenty. November thirteenth, Captain Cutter, with one company of mounted infantry and a portion of Whittemore's battery, (mounted,) belonging to the garrison of Clarksville, had a fight near Palmyra with Captain Grey's company of guerrillas, killing two, wounding five, and taking one prisoner; Cutter's loss, one lieutenant and one man wounded. November sixteenth, Scout organized by General Paine and sent out from Gallatin and La Vergne returned, and report having killed five and captured twenty-six guerrillas, with horses, sheep, cattle, and hogs in their possession, collected for the use of the rebel army. Brigadier-General Crook, commanding Second division of cavalry, was ordered, November seventeenth, to concentrate his division at or near Huntsville, Ala., and to patrol the north side of the Tennessee from Decatur to Bridgeport, and to
Doc. 19.-the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. Knoxville, Monday, Nov. 16. The excitement consequent on the desperate dash of Forrest and Wheeler's cavalry upon General Sanders, on Saturday, and their approach to within two miles of Knoxville, together with the news of Longstreet's advance upon Burnside below, has somewhat subsided. The panic last night among the citizens can only be compared to the celebrated siege of Cincinnati, and, in fact, the gathering of Major McDowell's corps of payge of that duty, and telegraph what he wishes to be made public. Of course, that proposition admits of no argument, however much we might be inclined to regard with jealous eyes an opposition correspondent with such unusual facilities. Monday, November 16, P. M..--Rumors reached us last evening that a battle was being fought at Campbell's Station, twelve miles from Knoxville, on the Lenoir road. Longstreet's army, variously estimated to number from ten thousand to twenty thousand strong, a
ased with the officers and men of our regiment for to-day's work. It is said by some of the boys that the General remarked in the morning, that his dependence for the cover of this retreat was in Pennebaker's mounted infantry brigade. At the opening of our battery, the rebs, seeing our position and readiness to receive them, fell back. After dark our regiment moved from the hill to the rear of another hill nearer the pontoon-bridge. Here we drew rations and camped for the night. November sixteenth, we moved forward a few hundred yards, and threw up a temporary breastwork of timbers. After dark our brigade moved across the river, through town to the Tazewell road, to our horses that were previously sent over. About midnight we mounted; moved through town to the Loudon road; had not gone far till we met General Burnside; turned back and came back to the Tazewell road; bivouacked till morning. November seventeenth, our brigade moved through town and out on the Winter Gap or Cl