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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
On the matron's time-worn mantle Let the Poet's wreath be laid.” J. W. H. My first writing in the new house, where may God help and bless us all. May no dark action shade our record in this house, and if possible, no surpassing sorrow. After the wide sunny spaces of No. 13 Chestnut Street, the new house seemed small and dark; nor was Boylston Place even in those days a specially cheerful cul de sac; yet we remember it pleasantly enough as the home of much work and much play. November 19. Had the comforts of faith from dear James Freeman [Clarke] to-day. Felt restored to something like the peace I enjoyed before these two tasks of printing and moving broke up all leisure and all study. Determined to hold on with both hands to the largeness of philosophical pursuit and study, and to do my utmost to be useful in this connection and path of life .... Comforting myself with Hedge's book. Determined to pass no more godless days.... She began to read Grote's Plato, and
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
at the Institution. I spoke of the New Testament word about the mustard seed, so small but producing such a stately tree. I compared this little seed to a benevolent impulse in the mind of S. G. H. And the Institution to a tree. what is smaller than a human heart? what seems weaker than a good intention? yet the good intention, followed by the faithful heart, has produced this great refuge in which many generations have already found the way to a life of educated usefulness. . .. November 19 ... before the sermon I had prayed for some good thought of God. This came to me in the shape of a sudden perception to this effect: I am in the father's house already. . . . November 30. ... in giving thanks to-day, I made my only personal petitions, which were first, that some of my dear granddaughters might find suitable husbands,... and lastly, that I might serve in some way until the last breath leaves my body.... December 16. I had greatly desired to see the Barber. kind Mrs
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
ties truly to serve, and for the continuance of that gift of the word which is sometimes granted me. November 12. I to attend meeting of Council of Jewish Women; say something regarding education. .... I was warmly received and welcomed, and recited my Battle Hymn by special request. This last gave me an unexpected thrill of satisfaction. The president said: Dear Mrs. Howe, there is nothing in it to wound us. I had feared that the last verse might trouble them, but it did not. November 19. Was busy trying to arrange bills and papers so as to go to Gardiner to-morrow with my Richards son-in-law, when in the late afternoon Rosalind told me that dear noble Ednah Cheney had died. This caused me much distress. My first word was: The house of God is closed! Such a friend is indeed a sanctuary to which one might retire for refuge from all mean and unworthy things. A luminous intellect, unusual powers of judgment and of sympathy as well. She has been a tower of strength to