Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for November 27th or search for November 27th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
of conviction, affection, and personality which, being effected, the individual will see the reality of the ethical aspects of life and the necessary following of happiness upon a good will and its strenuous prosecution. I began Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre two or three days ago. Gave a small party to Baron Osten Sacken.... Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must, makes the difference between the beggar and the thief. November 26. Very unwell; a good day's work, nevertheless. November 27. Better. Last week was too fatiguing for a woman of my age. I cannot remember my fortyseven years, and run about too much. The oratorio should, I fear, be given up. December 8. I came in from Lexington last night after the reading1 in an open buggy with a strange driver, a boy of eighteen, who when we were well under way showed me a pistol,--a revolver, I think,--and said that he never travelled at night without one. As the boy's very face was unknown to me, the whole At the Lex
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
His eyes were dark and expressive, and his hair and beard were snowwhite. Several guests were present.... Victor Hugo seated himself alone upon a sofa, and talked to no one. While the rest of the company kept up a desultory conversation, a servant announced M. Louis Blanc, and our expectations were raised only to be immediately lowered, for at this announcement Victor Hugo arose and withdrew into another room, from which we were able to hear the two voices in earnest conversation.... November 27. Packing to leave Paris to-night for Turin. The blanks left in my diary do not mark idle days. I have been exceedingly busy, . . . have written at least five newspaper letters, and some other correspondence. Grieved this morning over the time wasted at shop windows, in desiring foolish articles which I could not afford to buy, especially diamonds, which I do not need for my way of life. Yet I have had more good from my stay in Paris than this empty Journal would indicate. Have seen
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
mes. Oh! could Jesus pass this way Ye should have no need to pray. He would go on foot to see All your depths of misery. Succor comes. He would smooth your frowzled hair, He would lay your ulcers bare, He would heal as only can Soul of God in heart of man. Jesus comes. Ah! my Jesus! still thy breath Thrills the world untouched of death. Thy dear doctrine showeth me Here, God's loved humanity Whose kingdom comes. The summer was spent in France; in November they sailed for Egypt. November 27, Egypt. Land early this morninga long flat strip at first visible. Then Arabs in a boat came on board. Then began a scene of unparalleled confusion, in the midst of which Cook's Arabian agent found me and got my baggage — helping us all through quietly, and with great saving of trouble.... A drive to see Pompey's Pillar and obelisk. A walk through the bazaar. Heat very oppressive. Delightful drive in the afternoon to the Antonayades garden and villa. . . Mr. Antonayades was most hosp
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
I did not know of. I reproached myself for having always been repelled by her ugliness of countenance and tart manner, and having thus failed to come within the sphere of her really noble influence. The occasion recalled a whole vision of the early and painful struggle in Boston; of the martyrdom of feeling endured by friends of the slave — of Parker's heroic house and pulpit. It seemed, as it often does, great to have known these things, little to have done so little in consequence. November 27. Finished my lecture on Woman in the Greek Drama. It was high time, as my head and eyes are tired with the persistent strain.... All the past week has been hard work. No pleasure reading except a very little in the evening. December 1. . . . Took 2.30 train for Melrose .... I read my new lecture--Woman as shown by the Greek Dramatists: of whom I quoted from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Aristophanes. A Club Tea followed: a pleasant one. I asked the mothers present whether they educated