hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for November 28th or search for November 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ree years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars. George S. Russell, Rodolphus Swift, and James Hammet were chosen a committee to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the contingent of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the bounties. Another meeting was held on the 19th of August, at which it was voted to increase the bounty fifty dollars; and, at an adjourned meeting held on the 28th of November, it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months service, and be credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. Godfrey C. Macomber, Charles G. Davis, Joseph R. Davis, and Adoniram Gilmore were added to the recruiting committee. On the 29th of December the selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever sums of money may be necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
n were authorized to appoint a suitable person to raise a military company, as a part of the town's quota. A vote was passed thanking Frederick F. Hassam for the manifestation of his patriotism in decorating the town hall with national emblems and trophies. August 21st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each inhabitant of Dorchester who shall enlist for nine months and be credited to the quota of the town. 1863. November 28th, The selectmen, John Amory Davis, Henry S. Adams, Robert Johnson, and Henry L. Pierce, were appointed to superintend recruiting, pay bounties, and fill the quota of the town; the treasurer was authorized to pay all bills contracted by the committee, and for that purpose to borrow not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars. 1864. March 15th, A similar vote was passed. June 16th, Sixteen thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of bounties and recruiting expenses. Several other
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
oney to pay bounties. Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to nine-months volunteers. December 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow more money, and a committee of six citizens was chosen to encourage enlistments. December 26th, The selectmen were directed to secure recruits for three years service instead of for nine months, and to add fifty dollars to the bounty already offered, if it shall be necessary in order to get volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 1863. November 28th, Chose a committee of one from each school-district to assist the selectmen in recruiting. They were also directed to call public meetings from time to time to encourage enlistments. 1864. April 11th, Voted, to pay six hundred and twenty-five dollars to citizens who had subscribed and paid that amount to encourage recruiting. Several other meetings were held during the year, showing the zeal and determination of the town to fulfil every demand made upon it by the Government for m