Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 29th or search for November 29th in all documents.

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Depot, I was ordered to: move slowly and leisurely back to Chattanooga. On the following day, the Fifteenth corps destroyed absolutely and effectually the railroad, from a point half-way between Greysville and Ringgold, back to the State line; and General Grant, coming to Greysville, consented that, instead of returning to Chattanooga, I might send back my artillery, wagons, and impediments, and make a circuit by the north as far as the Hiawassee. Accordingly, on the morning of November twenty-ninth, General Howard moved from Parker's Gap to Cleveland, General Davis by way of McDaniel's Gap, and General Blair, with two divisions of the Fifteenth army corps, by way of Julian's Gap — all meeting at Cleveland that night. Here another good break was made in the Cleveland and Dalton road. On the thirtieth, the army moved to Charleston, General Howard approaching so rapidly that the enemy evacuated in haste, leaving the bridge but partially damaged, and five car-loads of flour and p
and Germania Fords, and the principal part of the cavalry at Ely's Ford. The Second corps, General Warren, lost in killed, wounded, and missing, two hundred and eighty-nine men, being engaged on the twenty-seventh, twenty-eighth, and twenty-ninth of November. General H. D. Terry, Third division, Sixth corps, lost about twenty men. It was most unfortunate that General French, of the Third corps, lost his road on the twenty-seventh of November, thereby causing so great a delay in uniting wiWilderness Tavern, fifteen miles above Fredericksburgh and five above Chancellorsville, in rear of the enemy's lines. He destroyed fifty, brought off twenty, besides one hundred and fifty mules and the same number of prisoners. Sunday morning, Nov. 29-11 A. M. There was a little skirmishing yesterday, but it did not amount to any thing. Both armies are in line of battle. The rain yesterday doubtless interfered with the fighting. It is cloudy this morning, but not raining. There has bee
venth, part of Colonel Wolford's command remained in this ditch, while the rest made Headquarters on what is now called Ward's Hill. This is the hill our regiment took position on, on the evening of the fifteenth--hence the name, Ward's Hill. Our regiment was the first troop that ever ascended it. Twenty-eighth, we still remained in the pit. Now three companies of our regiment — B, H, and G--Captain Ragsdale commanding. Captain Scott, Forty-fifth Ohio, commanding skirmish-line. November twenty-ninth, long before day the rebels made a desperate charge on the north side of the river, got into the rifle-pits, and even into Fort Sanders, but were driven back with great slaughter by the Ninth army corps. Heavy firing was kept up from that till daylight. At daylight the enemy made a simultaneous charge on both sides of the river. They charged upon the pit we were in. Three companies of our regiment (B, H, and G) and the Twenty-fourth Kentucky infantry were in the ditch, and two com