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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 520 520 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 112 112 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 36 36 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 31 31 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 28 28 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for December or search for December in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
formed a fine combination, and although the former was advanced in years at the breaking out of the war, and not very robust, yet he was ever punctual in the performance of his duties. Such men as we have mentioned assisted greatly in lightening the labors of the venerable Secretary of the Navy, and enabled him to carry the Navy successfully through a great crisis. It was sometime in April, 1862, that the Department determined to build up an ironclad navy on the Ericsson idea, and by December of that year twenty single-turreted Monitors were contracted for, or under construction, all their plans having been made ready for the assembling of Congress. These vessels were to be of about 614 tons displacement, excepting a few of 844 tons. They were very much larger than the original Monitor and were designed to carry two 15-inch guns in a revolving turret. The idea of the first Monitor was carried out in these vessels to a great extent, but with such modifications as experience wa
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ilmington or Richmond. Fortunately for the Confederates, the blockade-runner Banshee succeeded in eluding the blockaders and getting into Wilmington; and owing to this timely supply of provisions the reserves at the forts were prevented from being starved out. As it was, the commissaries were only able to supply them with thirty days rations. At that moment there were only 3,400,000 rations of bacon and pork in the whole Confederacy to subsist 300,000 men for 25 days. In the month of December matters were still worse; there was not meat enough in the Southern Confederacy for the armies it had in the field. That the meat must be obtained from abroad was plainly seen, and it was also recognized that, in order to obtain it, it would be necessary to break the blockade by some means then untried or unknown. Nor was the transportation adequate to the demands of the occasion. The supply of fresh meat to General Lee's army was precarious, and, if the army fell back from Richmond and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
d of November the project was revived, and 6,500 men were promised [!] from the Army of the James. It would only require forty-eight hours to equip 8,000 troops and collect the transports, yet no move was made from October until the middle of December. General Grant had appointed General Weitzel to command the troops, but from the very beginning Butler made himself the prominent figure, and Weitzel had little more to say than if he had been the General's orderly. General Grant evidently suppt Fisher are interesting. In spite of many inaccuracies, he shows the pertinacity with which the Navy held on to what they had begun, and the difficulties they had encountered against the fierce gales that swept the coast during those months of December and January. Not a vessel left her post, and the Navy could have protected the landing of any number of troops. It was manifestly the object of the military historian to give the Army more credit than was due them, and make the Navy play a s