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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 520 520 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 112 112 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 36 36 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 31 31 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 28 28 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters. You can also browse the collection for December or search for December in all documents.

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ent our time out of doors and bathing in the waters of the bay which we thought pretty good for December. On the 18th of December, Lieutenants Wolcott and Bigelow resigned to accept positions in a ndover and Sergeant Warren K. Snow of Boston as second lieutenants. Life at Camp Andrew from December till the following February was uneventful though by no means idle. The men worked hard, drill stay in New Orleans, however, the men began to regain their health. The time from August to December was spent largely in drilling, a parade and some form of drill constituting a part of each day' returned to the battery. They were ragged and dirty, having had a hard time. The month of December was devoted largely to drilling. Recruits kept coming in and these had to be made into soldiereadquarters in the North and soon secured enlistments enough to fill existing vacancies, and in December was on his way back to the seat of action. Lieutenant Snow, who had been weakened by his wound