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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 520 520 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 112 112 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 36 36 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 31 31 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 28 28 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December or search for December in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
al index to first ten volumes of Southern Histori-Cal Society Papers, which we published in our December number, cost us a good deal of labor, and considerable extra expense for the printing; but we aic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for December, is an interesting and valuable number, and we again commend it as worthy of a wide circulationy on the 27th of November, to go into quarters for the winter, and during all the early part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officerth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated7th of June he wrote to the Secretary of War tendering his resignation, which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
terests of our Society, looking after Permanent Endowment as well as annual subscriptions. If this gallant soldier, accomplished gentleman, and Prince of Agents needed any commendation from us there is very much we could say. But to friends among whom he may go we will only say: Hear him for his cause, and help him as you love the name and fame of our Confederate soldiers and people. our General index to first ten volumes of Southern Histori-Cal Society Papers, which we published in our December number, cost us a good deal of labor, and considerable extra expense for the printing; but we are sure our readers will appreciate it as a very important addition to the value of our volumes. A glance at it will show the invaluable work which the Society has already done, and will indicate the great work which yet remains to be accomplished. We intended it as a New Year's offering to our subscribers, and an earnest of what we have in store for them in future—always providing they do not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
s for this admirable edition of a book which has long been noted for its real ability, and whose author President Davis justly pronounces the fairest and most careful of the Northern writers on the war. We expect to have hereafter a full review of the book, and to point out some very serious errors into which the author has fallen; but meantime we advise our friends to buy the book. The publishers, J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotes fully from the diaries, letters, etc., of the distinguished Admiral, and touches on many matters of deepest interest, and historic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for December, is an interesting and valuable number, and we again commend it as worthy of a wide circulation. We thank the editors for kindly reference to our Papers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ucceeding in the task he had assigned himself, he mounted his team, and by a little perseverance, all difficulties were overcome. Ringgold was reached on the night of the 25th, and the next day at 5 P. M., the battery encamped near Dalton. General Bragg was here superseded in the command of the army by General Joseph E. Johnston. In winter quarters. The command proceeded to Sugar Valley on the 27th of November, to go into quarters for the winter, and during all the early part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officers, Captain Rowan, Lieutenants Ritter, Giles and Doucaster, and Surgeon Rogers built themselves a cabin twelve by sixteeen feet, with a fireplace and chimney, window and door. After their long campaigning, this was a delightful change. On the 20th of January, 1864, the whole battalion, for easier access to long forage, was ordered to Kingston, where it again built winter quarters. Between the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
f winning peace upon the soil of that State, but, alas, at Sharpsburg, from early morn till dewy eve, we fought till To the right, to the left and around, and around, Death whirled in its dance on the bloody ground, 'Till God's sunlight was quenched in fiery fight, And over the hosts fell brooding night. It was a drawn battle—and sadly the Potomac was recrossed at Shepherdstown. The fifth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated attacks of the Federal troops For the foe had crossed from the other side That day, in the face of a murderous fire That swept them down in its terrible ire: And their life-blood went to color the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood. Murfreesboro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
rmy and its thorough discipline, until worn down with fatigue and suffering he was warned by his physicians that rest alone could restore him to his accustomed vigorous health, and on the seventh of May he turned over the command of the army to Colonel Rogers. General Johnston repaired to New Orleans, and consulting eminent physicians, who insisted on absolute rest as the only remedy; and on the 27th of June he wrote to the Secretary of War tendering his resignation, which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice President, and on the 22d of December, after their installation, General Johnston was appointed Secretary of War, a position which he filed with distinguished ability until 1840, when he resigned. After his resignation he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nathan Hale of ArkansasDavid O. Dodd. (search)
t to him, Now, David, you know every foot of country about Little Rock, and, as a return for this pass, I shall expect you to go into Little Rock, inform yourself as to the position, numbers, and designs of the enemy, and report to me on your way back to Texas. General Fagan knew him to be brave, patriotic, and trustworthy. He determined to enter Little Rock, remain long enough to pick up all information of value that he could get, and report to Fagan as directed. Consequently, early in December, he went as a farmer's son to Little Rock, where everybody knew him, and pretended to be seeking business of some sort. He had spent the most of his school life in the city, and, of course, had no difficulty in getting lodging and accommodations without expense. He remained in the city three weeks, freely mingling with the Federal officers and soldiers in that garrison. Finally, he applied at General Steele's headquarters for a pass to go into the country. He was told to apply at the pr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
A. C. C. head-quarter's Rowan's battery, near Dalton, Ga., April 10th, 1864. Major,—I respectfully submit for your consideration a few facts in regard to the feed furnished the stock of this battalion. I have been in the Tennessee army since last November and can truly say during the whole of that time the stock of my command has not been half fed. In some instances the horses going for two days at a time without anything to eat. Rotten corn, half rations at that, with no fodder in December and January. Full rations of corn and one pound of fodder, sometimes, (bad at that) in February and March. I have just received a good lot of horses, which I cannot keep in condition unless I get something to feed them on. I have my horses as well groomed and otherwise cared for as can be, but good grooming and other necessary attention will not feed them. Corn alone will not keep horses in condition; they will not eat rations of corn if no long feed is furnished. Horses fed with corn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
le and intend permanently to occupy a country and can make its people believe it, it is futile to hope with confidence for any material aid from them, particularly in men. It is hoping against hope. The Tennessee campaign. After the army had rested for a while from its arduous trials, Bragg commenced his movements into Tennessee preparatory to an advance on Nashville. Tulehoma and Shelbyville were his rallying points, with outposts at Murfreesboroa, Eagleville, &c.; and finally, in December, the army was concentrated in and around Murfreesboroa, with outposts advanced to the vicinity of Nashville. Instead of Rosecrans, who had superceded Buell, going into winter quarters at Nashville, as Bragg was led to believe from spies, he broke up camps on the morning of the 25th of December, and pouring down his hordes by way of the Wilson, Nolinsville, Murfreesboroa, and Jefferson turnpikes, drove our outposts back to the main line, established near and crossing Stone river, a short di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
st, 1883. General A. M. Scales of North Carolina, will deliver the address-his subject being The Battle of Fredericksburg—and> the well known character of this gallant soldier and accomplished gentleman gives assurance that we shall have something of real interest and historic value. After the address comes the banquet, at which there will be speeches and a good time generally. renewals would be doubly acceptable just now because we cannot reasonably look for many new subscribers until December. We need the money due us, and we beg again that our friends will save themselves and us further trouble by remitting at once. And your own remittance will be all the more acceptable if you will induce others to remit along with you. We hope that none of our present subscribers will consent to allow their names to be stricken from our rolls; but, if from any cause, they do not propose to renew, then let them notify us to that effect, and be sure to return any Papers they have received to w
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