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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 520 520 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 112 112 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 36 36 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 31 31 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 28 28 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December or search for December in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
n facilities, the three companies were enabled to reach their destination and join the regiment which was then in quarters at Camp Wigfall, near the late battle-field. For several weeks encamped at this place, the regiment suffered exceedingly from sickness. By the surgeon's statement the sick-call at one time numbered 240, while fifty-seven of the cases were typhoid fever. The mortality was large. From camp to camp the command was moved until it went into winter-quarters on Bull Run in December, where it remained, with only such changes in position as the exigencies of the situation in outpost and picket duty required, until the 8th day of March, 1862. Meantime the regiment had been incorporated into a brigade with the 5th N. C. State Troops, Colonel Duncan K. McRae; the 20th Georgia, Colonel Smith; the 24th Virginia, Colonel Jubal A. Early, and the 38th Virginia, of which brigade Colonel Early being the ranking officer, he was placed in command, subsequently being commissioned a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
his cadets were for sometime employed in drilling and setting up as soldiers, the recruits who were assembling for the war. In May, 1861, he was commissioned as colonel of the 16th Regiment of Virginia Infantry then stationed at Norfolk. In December, 1861, he was commissioned as brigadier-general, and assigned to the command of a military district extending from Smithfield, Va., to Weldon, N. C., and including 15,000 troops. In April, 1862, he and his brigade were, upon his request, ordererous assaults and skirmishes on the peninsula, and in the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. In June, 1862, General Colston was stricken down with a severe attack of fever and jaundice, from which he did not recover until the following December; when he reported for duty and was assigned to the command of a brigade of Southwestern Virginians, and was ordered to Petersburg. In April, 1863, by request of Stonewall Jackson, who had been for ten years his colleague in the faculty of the