hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 165 165 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 69 69 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 45 45 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 1st or search for December 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

eassured by the cessation of our pursuit, sent a flag of truce to our advanced lines at Catoosa, by Major Calhoun Benham, requesting permission to bury his dead and care for his wounded abandoned on the field of his last disaster at Ringgold. Copies of this correspondence have heretofore been forwarded. Also on the thirtieth, under instructions from department headquarters, Gross's brigade, Cruft's division, marched for the old battle-field at Chickamauga to bury our dead; and on the first of December, the infantry and cavalry remaining left Ringgold — Geary and Cruft to return to their old camps, and Osterhaus to encamp in Chattanooga valley. The reports of the commanders exhibit a loss in the campaign, including all the engagements herein reported, in killed, wounded, and missing, of nine hundred and sixty. Inconsiderable in comparison with my apprehension, or the ends accomplished, nevertheless, there is cause for the deepest regret and sorrow. Among the fallen are some of t
carry this out would necessitate a complete abandonment of our base. It was the opinion of General Warren that this plan was more feasible and much less hazardous than an attack in front. We remained quiet the rest of the day and the first day of December, during which time the rebels continued, like sensible leaders, to strengthen and enlarge their fortifications, improving the leisure and security afforded them by our inactivity at all points. Our whole army fell back from their position on the night of December first. We began to retire just after dark, and on the morning of December second, in pursuance of orders from army headquarters, our troops recrossed the Rapidan, the infantry and artillery crossing at Culpeper and Germania Fords, and the principal part of the cavalry at Ely's Ford. The Second corps, General Warren, lost in killed, wounded, and missing, two hundred and eighty-nine men, being engaged on the twenty-seventh, twenty-eighth, and twenty-ninth of November
t, and failed in both, we can conceive no further necessity for his longer residence in East-Tennessee, and if he be not gone to-morrow, we shall be unable to account for it. November 30--A. M.--It has been comparatively quiet this morning. A few shots have been exchanged between the batteries and an occasional one along the skirmish line. The enemy exhibits no indication of a renewal of the attack. The total number of prisoners taken yesterday, is two hundred and thirty-four. December 1--A. M.--Still quiet. The, enemy show no signs of another attack. The weather is clear but cold, with severe frosts at night. The following order, congratulatory to our troops for the victory of Sunday last, was addressed to them this morning, and was received. with enthusiastic cheering all around. the line: General field orders--no. 33.headquarters army of the Ohio,; in the field, November 30, 1863. The brilliant events of the twenty-ninth instant, so successful to our arms
eamboat boilers at this place, cut in half lengthwise, and seven kettles made expressly for the purpose, each holding two hundred gallons. They were in the practice of burning out one hundred and thirty gallons of salt daily. Beside destroying these boilers, a large quantity of salt was thrown into the lake. Two large flat-boats and six ox-carts were demolished, and seventeen prisoners were taken, who were paroled and released, as the boat was too small to bring them away. On the first of December, Acting Ensign Edwin Cressy arrived at St. Andrew's Sound, from the East Pass of Santa Rosa Sound, with the stern-wheel steamer Bloomer, and her tender, the sloop Carolina, having heard of the expedition to Lake Ocala, and placed his command at the disposal of Acting Master Browne for more extensive operations near St. Andrew's; and accordingly three officers and forty-eight men were sent from the Restless to the Bloomer, and she proceeded to West Bay, where the rebel government's salt
good judgment in the thickest torrents of leaden rain and iron hail. The rebels having been compelled to return to their own side of the house, seemed perfectly willing to stay there. About this time orders were given to cease hostilities until the dead and wounded could be removed. The remainder of the evening was silent. Both sides were tired from their hard day's work. November thirtieth, we still remained in the ditches; an occasional fire. The rebels make no advances. December first, still in the rifle-pits. Some firing all around the lines. Second and third, no fighting of any consequence; now and then a shot. December fourth, about three o'clock in the morning Sherman's advance came up. We kept in readiness all day to move out. No advances on either side. December fifth, after having been closely besieged twenty days, early in the morning, we prepared to march. About nine o'clock A. M., we started — Shackleford's corps — our regiment in front; crossed the
rnished both officers and men by the rebels consist of about one pound of corn bread, made from unbolted meal, and one fourth of a pound of poor fresh meat per day. The meat has been issued to the prisoners but about half the time since the first of December last. In addition to the rations of bread and meat, as above stated, the prisoners draw about two quarts of rice to one hundred men. There is a sufficient quantity of salt furnished, and a very small quantity of vinegar. I will here remarissued to our officers and men now prisoners of war. The condition of our unfortunate enlisted men, now in the hands of the enemy, is much worse than that of the officers. From early in May last, when I arrived in Richmond, to about the first of December, all the enlisted men were taken to what is called Belle Island, and turned into an inclosure, like so many cattle in a slaughter-pen. Very few of them had tents, or shelter of any kind, and the few tents furnished were so poor and leaky a
ing via Tazewell to Walker's Ford. On the twenty-eighth, crossed the Clynch, and bivouacked at Brooks's, four miles distant. On the twenty-ninth, he moved to Maynardsville, and on the thirtieth thence toward Knoxville, sending a detachment of the Fifth Indiana cavalry in advance. Having proceeded fifteen miles, he came up with a rebel patrolling party, and soon afterward learned that a considerable force was at Blain's Cross-Roads. He moved back to Maynardsville, and on the morning of December first his pickets were attacked at the Gap, four miles below Maynardsville, on the Knoxville road. Reenforcements were sent, consisting of detachments from each regiment and two of the Fourteenth Illinois howitzers. More or less firing continued during the day, both parties holding their ground. A scouting-party sent toward Blain's Cross-Roads was driven back. Finding that a considerable cavalry force was approaching, with a view of surrounding him, Colonel Graham, at midnight, fell back
tion, and in accordance with orders, I returned to Ringgold. We recaptured two of our wounded men, took two more prisoners, found broken caissons, wagons, ambulances, dead and dying men of the enemy strewn along the way to a horrible extent. We remained at Ringgold until the evening of the thirtieth November, when I received orders to return to Whiteside via the Chickamauga battle-field. We marched to Reed's farm, on west Chickamauga, six miles, and camped for the night. On the first day of December, we crossed the creek, proceeded two miles to the memorable battle-field of the nineteenth and twentieth of September, 1863. We buried the remains of about four hundred of our brave fallen comrades that had been the prey of animals for two and a half months. On the left of our line, the dead of the enemy over a portion of the ground had bee well buried, and ours tolerably well covered, but toward the centre and right but few of ours were attempted to be buried or covered at all. The