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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 165 165 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 69 69 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 45 45 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for December 1st or search for December 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
ing volunteers. August 25th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers enlisting to the credit of the town in the nine months service, and to pay eleven dollars a month to each of their families while in the service. 1863. December 1st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow eleven hundred dollars for recruiting purposes, if it shall be needed. 1864. At the annual March meeting it was voted that all the business of recruiting be left with the selectmen, and that they be aber 4th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town, and more if necessary. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay bounties. 1863. December 1st, The town chose Nathaniel C. Fowler, Oliver Gorham, and David Matthews to co-operate with the selectmen in raising the town's quota of volunteers under the late call of the President for more men. The selectmen were authorized to draw upon the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
or recruiting purposes. August 31st, Voted, that the agents of the town for recruiting be directed to pay four-tenths of the cost of a substitute to any enrolled militia-man of said town who will put a substitute into the army, said substitute to answer on the present quota of the town; said payments not to exceed four hundred dollars for a three-years man, three hundred for a two-years man, and one hundred for a one-year man. Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for this purpose. December 1st, The treasurer was instructed to borrow two thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, provided the men subject to draft raise five hundred dollars. This amount was raised by them, and paid over to the proper authorities. 1865. March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever money was necessary to pay State aid to the soldiers' families. Otis furnished one hundred and thirteen men for the war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. One was a commis
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
rected to perform the duties in their stead. 1862. March 3d, The State aid to the families of volunteers was continued. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding fifty-three hundred dollars, for the payment of the same. August 25th, The same amount of bounty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. December 1st, A committee was appointed of one from each school district to aid the selectmen in recruiting men. It was voted that to volunteers not living in the town there be paid a bounty of one hundred and ten dollars. 1863. March 2d, Voted, that State aid be paid to soldiers' families the same as last year. 1864. May 16th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years, when mustered into the military service
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
h each soldier with a revolver. June 4th, The vote to furnish revolvers was reconsidered. July 19th, The finance committee were instructed to pay each volunteer from that town a bounty of one hundred dollars, and it was voted that such volunteer be exempt from taxation for war purposes. 1862. August 15th, Voted, that each person who volunteers to the credit of the town, before Monday next, be paid a bounty of one hundred and ten dollars, after that time a bounty of one hundred only. December 1st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars, and the finance committee were directed to enlist men for nine months service wherever they could get them, to fill the urgent demand made by the Government. 1863. April 6th, The town appropriated four thousand dollars out of which soldiers' families shall be paid for the ensuing year; and that the widows of those who have died in the service shall receive the same aid as before; that each soldier who enlisted in the Tenth R
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
mustered in. 1863. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to use such sums as were necessary for aid to the families of volunteers. July 20th, They were directed to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men. November 23d, Charles H. Waters, B. L. Howe, Henry Butterfield, David McCaine, George W. Fiske, and Alonzo Simmons were chosen a committee to act with the selectmen in recruiting men to fill the quota of the town, and seven hundred dollars were appropriated for expenses. December 1st, Voted, that a sum not less than forty-five hundred, and not more than five thousand, dollars be placed at the disposal of the selectmen to obtain thirty-four recruits. 1864. April 4th, Voted, to raise two thousand dollars to refund to citizens the money they had voluntarily advanced for recruiting purposes, and nine hundred dollars to fill up the present demand upon the town for men; also five thousand dollars to pay aid to families of soldiers. May 30th, The selectmen were directed
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
e rescinded; and bounties to those who had enlisted, or who should enlist, were directed to be paid without conditions. November 4th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twelve hundred dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. 1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow four thousand dollars for State aid to soldiers' families during the year. September 28th, Voted, that State aid be paid to the families of drafted men, the same as is paid to families of volunteers. December 1st, John W. Capron, Moses Taft, Charles A. Wheelock, Alvin Cook, Robert Taft, George W. Hobbs, and Samuel Taft were chosen to assist in recruiting, with authority to employ agents to proceed to the front and induce soldiers to re-enlist to the credit of the town. 1864. May 2d, The town bounty was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars for volunteers for three years, and so remained until the end of the war, to which time recruiting was continued. Uxbridge furnished two hundred an