hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 165 165 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 69 69 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 45 45 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December 1st or search for December 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o Memphis to-night. Sunday, November 24th.—Our military authorities seem to act on the principle, the better the day, the better the deed, as Sunday is generally the day selected for moving. Moved our quarters into the house formerly occupied by General Cheatham. November 30th.—The soldiers are busy preparing log-huts for the winter. The ground is covered with snow. I am trying to redeem the time by reading. My books are Tookes's Pantheon and the works of Byron and Burns. Sunday, December 1st.—Winter's icy reign seems to be fairly inaugurated, and if we are to prognosticate the season by the first day we may look forward to three months of great suffering from cold weather. Have lost the day-allowed it to slip away without reading a chapter in my Bible. December 2d.—Snow fell to the depth of one inch this morning. My duties required me to be out on horseback all the morning. Spent the afternoon reading and writing. December 6th.—Ordered to report for duty to Dr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
o Memphis to-night. Sunday, November 24th.—Our military authorities seem to act on the principle, the better the day, the better the deed, as Sunday is generally the day selected for moving. Moved our quarters into the house formerly occupied by General Cheatham. November 30th.—The soldiers are busy preparing log-huts for the winter. The ground is covered with snow. I am trying to redeem the time by reading. My books are Tookes's Pantheon and the works of Byron and Burns. Sunday, December 1st.—Winter's icy reign seems to be fairly inaugurated, and if we are to prognosticate the season by the first day we may look forward to three months of great suffering from cold weather. Have lost the day-allowed it to slip away without reading a chapter in my Bible. December 2d.—Snow fell to the depth of one inch this morning. My duties required me to be out on horseback all the morning. Spent the afternoon reading and writing. December 6th.—Ordered to report for duty to Dr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
hese important pecuniary results, the canvass we have made has extended the knowledge of our work over a large territory where it was before comparatively unknown—added largely to our membership, raised us up active friends, secured most valuable material for our archives, and given promise of much larger results in the future. Publications. We have issued regularly our Southern Historical Society Papers, and are now completing our Volume XI, which will be ready for binding by the 1st of December. We have continued to receive from every quarter—from the North and from Europe, as well as from leading Confederates—the most gratifying assurances of the interest and value of these Papers, while we are gradually placing full sets of them on the shelves of the prominent public and private libraries of the country. The action of the great State of Texas in purchasing one hundred and sixty sets for distribution in the counties of the State must have a happy effect in inducing other<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Publications. (search)
Publications. We have issued regularly our Southern Historical Society Papers, and are now completing our Volume XI, which will be ready for binding by the 1st of December. We have continued to receive from every quarter—from the North and from Europe, as well as from leading Confederates—the most gratifying assurances of the interest and value of these Papers, while we are gradually placing full sets of them on the shelves of the prominent public and private libraries of the country. The action of the great State of Texas in purchasing one hundred and sixty sets for distribution in the counties of the State must have a happy effect in inducing other States to follow her example, and in calling the attention of private collectors to their value. We have now on hand about three hundred complete sets (worth unbound at least $7,200), and a much larger number of particular volumes. It is very gratifying to note the frequency with which writers on any part of the war quote
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
und the dead lying thick, piled one upon another, till the earth was hid by the woeful spectacle. Near this point, upon the right, General Lewis's horse was found lying upon the top of the works, and fifty yards within the enemy's main line of fortifications, a single Confederate soldier was found, face down, his head towards the enemy, having penetrated thus far alone, before he was shot. At midnight the Third Maryland was ordered to the front. Several hours later, on the morning of December 1st, the enemy evacuated their works and crossed the Harpeth River under fire from our batteries, before daylight. The Confederate army followed them in the afternoon, and after marching a few miles, encamped for the night. Early the following morning they entered upon the last day's march that intervened between them and Nashville. The battle of Nashville. On arriving within six miles of Nashville, Lee's corps was deployed at right angles with the Franklin pike, and the batteries f