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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 165 165 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 69 69 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 45 45 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December 1st or search for December 1st in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 14 (search)
fearless man, and a much respected officer. Captain Emmett, of General Rosser's staff, wounded. General Rosser had to fall back, owing to the heavy columns of infantry in front. We gave them a sight of our teeth from hilltop to hilltop almost hourly. 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th.—Falling back, continually in the saddle, night and day; reached Furrer's furnace cold and raining. 24th.—Was sent to the front with the twelve-pound brass howitzer of Timberville. 28th.—Back to the battery. December 1st.—Received a twelve-pound brass rifle gun for our detachment, captured by Lieutenant McNeal, near Moorfield. Brigade on the move under strict orders; cavalry and artillery moving quietly but rapidly. Rosser has made a splendid raid, completely surprising the enemy at New Creek, eighty miles west of our starting point, destroying a large amount of army stores, burning depot and capturing five heavy canons, six hundred prisoners, two hundred horses, some wagons; lost but very few men —
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 25 (search)
actice to go on. They quietly answered that neither would be right, and after a while they had no difficulty. During his course, from the date above given, Cadet Polk was a frequent guest at my house, and much beloved in my family; always maintaining a most consistent walk, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord, and beloved among his fellow cadets. He graduated July I, 1827, and was made brevet second lieutenant artillery. But he never entered upon service. He took leave of absence to December 1st of the same year, and then resigned. His health was not strong. He had inherited a tendency to pulmonary disorder, and it was thought that foreign travel would be of service, and he went abroad. I gave him a letter to Olenthus Gregory, whose book on the Evidences, etc., had been so connected with the progress of his mind in divine things. In it I related the good it had done under God's blessing. Dr. Gregory was then professor of mathematics in the Military College at Woolwich, and t