Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 2nd or search for December 2nd in all documents.

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e time of my receipt of General Grant's orders, scouting over and about Benton and Columbus. I left my aid, Major McCoy, at Charleston, to communicate with the cavalry, and hurry it forward. It overtook me in the night at Athens. On the second December, the army moved rapidly north toward London, twenty-six miles distant. About eleven A. M., the cavalry passed to the head of the column, and was ordered to push to Loudon, and, if possible, save the pontoon-bridge across the Tennessee, heced to turn cast, and trust to General Burnside's bridge at Knoxville. It was all-important that General Burnside should have notice of our coming, and but one day of the time remained. Accordingly, at Philadelphia, during the night of December second, I sent my Aid, Captain Audenreid, forward to Colonel Long, commanding the brigade of cavalry, to explain to him how all-important it was that General Burnside should have notice within twenty-four hours of our approach, and ordering him to
Warren that this plan was more feasible and much less hazardous than an attack in front. We remained quiet the rest of the day and the first day of December, during which time the rebels continued, like sensible leaders, to strengthen and enlarge their fortifications, improving the leisure and security afforded them by our inactivity at all points. Our whole army fell back from their position on the night of December first. We began to retire just after dark, and on the morning of December second, in pursuance of orders from army headquarters, our troops recrossed the Rapidan, the infantry and artillery crossing at Culpeper and Germania Fords, and the principal part of the cavalry at Ely's Ford. The Second corps, General Warren, lost in killed, wounded, and missing, two hundred and eighty-nine men, being engaged on the twenty-seventh, twenty-eighth, and twenty-ninth of November. General H. D. Terry, Third division, Sixth corps, lost about twenty men. It was most unfortunat
Captain Commanding Regiment. Twenty-third, private W. J. Coyle, wounded in left forearm. Twenty-fourth, Malcolm Sinclair, head. Twenty-fifth, Lieutenant Charles Watson. Privates Henry Pikel, thigh; Pat. Carlin, thigh. Sergeants Thomas Denham, killed; Robert Atherly, killed; privates, John Burgess, killed; David Schultz, killed. Sergeant Alfred Luce, wounded in the head; privates, Robert Paterson, thigh; Roderick McKenzie, shoulder; James Mitchell, breast; Wm. Smith, head. Knoxville, Dec. 2. Seventeen days of siege. We have no butter, chickens, eggs, vegetables, or other luxuries of that kind, and have only one quarter rations of coffee, but so far we have had plenty of pork, beef, flour, and meal. Every one is confident, and the best of spirits exist among all classes, citizens and soldiers. Up to last Saturday, an assault has been a matter of dread by many; but since the terrible storming of Fort Sanders on that memorable morning, and its disastrous and bloody results,
Florida. Rear-Admiral Bailey's reports. United States flag-ship San Jacinto, Key West, December 28, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have the gratification of reporting a very important service performed by the blockading force at St. Andrew's Sound, under command of Acting Master William R. Browne, in destroying a very extensive and valuable quality of salt-works, both at Lake Ocala and in St. Andrew's Bay. The circumstances are as follows: On the second of December, a boat was despatched from the bark Restless, then lying at St. Andrew's, bound to Lake Ocala, some twenty miles to the westward, where Acting Ensign James J. Russell landed with his men, and marched some five miles inland to Kent's Salt-Works, consisting of three different establishments, and utterly destroyed them. There were six steamboat boilers at this place, cut in half lengthwise, and seven kettles made expressly for the purpose, each holding two hundred gallons. They were in
terms of the unflinching courage and steadiness of his officers and men. Our loss is stated as follows: Sixty-fifth Indiana mounted infantry, two killed and six wounded; Fifth Indiana cavalry, five men killed, two officers and ten men wounded, and ten missing; Fourth Illinois cavalry, seven men wounded, eleven missing. Total, seven killed, twenty-three wounded, twenty-one missing. The report of Colonel Capron, of the Fourteenth Illinois cavalry, confirms the facts of the foregoing report, showing that the officers and men of his command twice repulsed the enemy, who charged with greatly superior force. The engagement began at ten A. M., and lasted until three P. M. They captured eighteen prisoners on the second and third of December. Bean Station, December 18, 1863. latest.--A reconnaissance to Morristown yesterday found the enemy in considerable (cavalry) force between that place and Russelville. There was some sharp skirmishing. We lost four killed and several wounded.
mostly uncovered, and frequently found separated and some distance from the bodies. On the west of the road from Gordon and Lee's Mills to Rossville, and on our centre and right, and as far as I went to the south, but few burials had been attempted of either party. We had not time to explore the entire field, and no doubt many of our soldiers remain unburied yet. All good clothing had been stripped from the bodies. Such a sight of inhumanity I hope never to witness again. On the second of December, we marched to our old quarters at this post, and thus ended our part of a fruitful campaign. My command took prisoners as follows, the evidence of which is herewith forwarded: List of names and rank taken by my provostmarshal, two hundred and forty-five; wounded on Mission Ridge and prisoners, twenty-one; voucher of Lieutenant Jaquis, Provost-Marshal of division, one hundred and eleven; with officers, four; vouchers of Captain Woodbury, of Twenty-ninth Ohio, one hundred and fift