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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for December 4th or search for December 4th in all documents.

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e, will make a simultaneous attack. I doubt if Buell will make a serious attack on my position here. I hope he may. I have requested General Crittenden to send a portion of his force to Nashville, if in his judgment it can be done without weakening his force too much. .... We still have a great many sick, but the measles which so afflicted our troops spreads much more slowly. The workmen of the enemy are rebuilding the railroad-bridge over Green River. At daybreak, on the 4th of December, a body of forty or fifty Federal Home Guards, under Captain Netter, attacked Whippoorwill Bridge, five or six miles from Russellville, on the railroad from Bowling Green to Memphis. It was guarded by a detail of thirteen men from the Ninth Kentucky Infantry (Confederate). All were asleep, except four on guard. These fired on the assailants, with effect, as was supposed. A volley was returned, which killed two and wounded another of the guard. The rest, being surrounded, surrendered
n November 30th, Zollicoffer, writing from Mill Springs, tells General Johnston that his cavalry had failed to seize the ferry-boats on the river; but that he is preparing to provide the means of crossing the river. He also says, So soon as it is possible, I will cross the river in force. But it was not clear from the context whether he was going to cross for a lodgment, or merely on an expedition to harass the enemy. General Johnston had written a letter to General Zollicoffer, on December 4th, approving entirely of every one of his moves so far, and informing him of the steps taken to send him supplies, etc. He adds: The most essential route to be guarded is that leading through Somerset and Monticello, as, in my opinion, most practicable for the enemy. On the same day, General Johnson wrote again, using this language: Mill Springs would seem to answer best to all the demands of the service; and from this point you may be able to observe the river, without cros