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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 4th or search for December 4th in all documents.

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n, to aid in the relief of that place. The approach of Sherman caused Longstreet to raise the siege of Knoxville and retreat eastward on the night of the fourth of December. Sherman succeeded in throwing his cavalry into Knoxville on the night of the third. Sherman arrived in person at Knoxville on the sixth, and after a cos; but General Wilson, working part with crib-work and part with trestles, made of the houses of the late town of Morgantown, progressed apace, and by dark of December fourth troops and animals passed on the bridge, and by daylight of the fifth the Fifteenth corps, General Blair, was over, and General Granger's corps and General Dallel road abreast of him, and in person I was at a house where the roads parted, when a messenger rode up bringing me a few words from General Burnside, dated December fourth. Colonel Long had arrived at Knoxville with his cavalry, and all was well there. Longstreet still lay before the place, but there were symptoms of a speed
d perfectly willing to stay there. About this time orders were given to cease hostilities until the dead and wounded could be removed. The remainder of the evening was silent. Both sides were tired from their hard day's work. November thirtieth, we still remained in the ditches; an occasional fire. The rebels make no advances. December first, still in the rifle-pits. Some firing all around the lines. Second and third, no fighting of any consequence; now and then a shot. December fourth, about three o'clock in the morning Sherman's advance came up. We kept in readiness all day to move out. No advances on either side. December fifth, after having been closely besieged twenty days, early in the morning, we prepared to march. About nine o'clock A. M., we started — Shackleford's corps — our regiment in front; crossed the river, passed through town, and moved out on the Greenville road. Marched out eight miles, capturing prisoners all the way. Our regiment stood picket