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to be four hundred strong, and had a successful skirmish with them. The road being boggy, he was obliged to corderoy several long stretches during the day. December 5. The two columns of the Fifteenth corps moved along their respective roads to a position nearly opposite Station No. 3. I was with the central column, and enemy's killed and wounded left on the field, his loss must have been severe; upward of two hundred (200) left in our hands were wounded by the sabre alone. December 5. We marched from Alexander to Jacksonboro, covering the rear of the Fourteenth army corps. December 6. The First brigade (Colonel Murray) marched to Sp: Cavalry, First division, Michigan Engineers, Third and Second divisions.--Weather: Fine.--Road: Swampy.--Supplies: Not so plenty.--Distance: Fifteen miles. December 5. Order of march: Third, Second, and First divisions. Cavalry sent to communicate with Fourteenth corps. Michigan Engineers ordered to army headquarters.--We
December 5. The two columns of the Fifteenth corps moved along their respective roads to a position nearly opposite Station No. 3. I was with the central column, and hearing that some resistance was offered to General Blair, near Ogeechee Church, I caused a feint of crossing the Ogeechee to be made at Flat Ford. Some men were thrown over in boats, but no bridge was laid. General Sherman detained General Blair near Station No. 4 1/2 for the left wing to come up.
December 5. We marched from Alexander to Jacksonboro, covering the rear of the Fourteenth army corps.
December 5. Order of march: Third, Second, and First divisions. Cavalry sent to communicate with Fourteenth corps. Michigan Engineers ordered to army headquarters.--Weather: Fine.--Road: Fair.--Supplies: Plenty.--Distance: Six miles.
aged destroying railroad; was rear-guard to the wagon-train, and skirmished with a small body of cavalry who were hovering in the rear, but with no result. December fifth to eighth, marched to Ebenezer Swamp, where we formed line of battle to protect the train while crossing the swamp, and at midnight marched two miles and camp own and Third division trains, crossing railroad at Lumpkins Station, passing through the town of Habersham to Smith's plantation, marching sixteen miles. December fifth, moved at daylight, camping at Buck Creek P. O., having marched sixteen miles. December sixth, moved at half-past 6 A. M., crossing Buck and Black Creeks, on through Waynesboro and two miles beyond. Division followed up and supported General Kilpatrick during the day and then made a night march to Alexander. December fifth, reached Jacksonboro. December sixth, arrived at Beaver Dam Creek and joined the other two divisions of the corps. December seventh, late at night, reached
camped six miles south-east of Sylvania. December 5.--Marched two miles south-east. December fourth, marched to near Hunter's Mill. December fifth, marched in rear of train. December sixs, and went into camp. Remained in camp December fifth until six P. M., waiting for the wagon-tracond; Philip Bowman, Co. F, taken prisoner December fifth; Sergeant Isaac T. Sweezy, Co. I, severe wand went into camp near Hunter's Mills. December fifth, marched three miles, and went into camp. rooked Run. Distance to-day, four miles. December 5.--Moved at half-past 6 A. M., crossed, durinarching eight (8) miles without incident. December 5.--This day we marched with the wagons, assisom the country at that time. On the fifth day of December, pursuant to an order received from Maavalry train. Marched eight (8) miles. December fifth, moved at half-past 6 A. M. in same order rocured from the country. On the eve of December fifth, ten wagons were well laden with stores fo[6 more...]
ut foraging. Friday, Dec. 27 30 A. M.4 15 P. M.1089Buckhead ChurchCloudyGoodPassed a magnificent plantation belonging to Doctor Jones, called Birdville. Saturday, Dec. 38 00 A. M.5 15 P. M.1552Beyond MillenCloudyGoodPassed the Millen prison on our left. Sunday, Dec. 47 00 A. M.5 00 P. M.1473Pine WoodsFineSwampySome of our men destroyed a mill on our left half a mile, burning the sluicegate, letting the water flood the road, delaying corps supply train and First division twelve hours. Monday, Dec. 54 00 P. M.6 00 P. M.281Near Little OgeecheeFineSwampyTrain of cavalry division, two hundred and eleven wagons, ordered to move with corps train. Tuesday, Dec. 66 00 A. M.4 30 P. M.1626Cowper CreekFine, rained during nightSwampySwamps very bad; road barricaded by felled trees. Wednesday, Dec. 78 30 A. M.4 00 P. M.968Near SpringfieldRained hard till noonSwampyCrossed Turkey Creek; Provost-Marshal ordered to take all captured horses to mount the cavalry. Thursday, Dec. 89 00 A. M.12 M. 93
k near Bostwick. Thirtieth, left camp at half-past 8 A. M. Course due north. Camped near Louisville at dark. December first, left camp at daylight, and camped at eight P. M., nothing of import transpiring. December second, left camp at half-past 6 A. M. Camped at Buckhead Creek at eight P. M. December third, left camp at half-past 5 A. M. Marched eighteen miles, and encamped at four P. M. Weather cloudy. December fourth, showers during the night. Nothing of importance transpiring. December fifth, left camp at dark. Camped at twelve P. M. Forage plenty. December sixth, left camp at nine A. M. Camped at dark. December seventh, left camp near Sylvania at ten A. M. Rain all night. Passed through the worst kind of swamps on road until daylight. December eighth, resumed the march at half-past 8 A. M. Weather good. Camped at dark. December ninth, left camp at eight A. M. Advance engaged with the enemy. First division, in advance, found the enemy strongly posted in earth-works a
before. Crossed the Augusta Railroad after dark, leaving Millen on our right. Sunday, December fourth, continued the march of yesterday till forty minutes past three A. M.; then halted, resuming the march at eight A. M. During the forenoon heard artillery-firing to our right and rear. Halted at two P. M. for dinner. Started again at half-past 4, and at six P. M. halted for the night, and this regiment went on picket. Marched yesterday and to-day about seventeen (17) miles. Monday, December fifth, leaving camp at fifteen minutes past nine A. M., marched steadily until forty-five minutes past eight P. M. Distance marched, fifteen (15) miles. Tuesday, December sixth, started at nine o'clock A. M., marching in rear of brigade wagontrain. Were delayed much during the day by obstructions placed in the roads by the enemy. Went into camp at forty-five minutes past eight P. M., having marched about nine (9) miles. Wednesday, December seventh, moved at seven A. M., marching th
Port Royal to watch the river above and below. On the twenty-eighth, General Hampton, guarding the upper Rappahannock, crossed to make a reconnoissance on the enemy's right, and, proceeding as far as Dumfries and Occoquan, encountered and dispersed his cavalry, capturing two squadrons and a number of wagons. About the same time, some dismounted men of Beale's regiment, Lee's brigade, crossed in boats below Port Royal to observe the enemy's left, and took a number of prisoners. On the fifth December General D. H. Hill, with some of his field-guns, assisted by Major Pelham, of Stuart's horse artillery, attacked the gunboats at Port Royal, and caused them to retire. With these exceptions, no important movement took place, but it became evident that the advance of the enemy would not be long delayed. The interval was employed in strengthening our lines, extending from the river about a mile and a half above Fredericksburgh along the range of hills in the rear of the city to the Richm