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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
n taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, although bounties were continued to be paid, and also State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. On the 8th of July a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service, who should enlist and be credited to the town, under the present call of the President, or under any future call he may make. On the 6th of December the selectmen were directed to procure as many volunteers as they may deem necessary, and on the 27th the treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever amount of money should be necessary to fill the contingent of the town. This policy appears to have been continued until the end of the war. The selectmen in 1866 report that the town furnished one hundred and two men for the war; but as Becket furnished its full quota on every demand made by the President for men, and at the end of th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
he Union and the Constitution, and the crisis of the hour, call upon us to sacrifice, with a military heart, our lives and our fortunes upon the altar of our country. August 11th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years service seventy-five dollars, in addition to the one hundred dollars already voted to be paid. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service who enlists and is credited to the quota of the town. December 6th, The bounty was raised to two hundred dollars to each volunteer, to fill the quota of the town, whether he is an inhabitant of the town of Easton or otherwise. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town, in its corporate capacity, to fill its quota of volunteers during this year. 1864. April 18th, The town voted to refund to the contributors three-fourths of the money paid by them to assist in filling the quotas of the town, of volunteers for military service, under
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
for three years and be credited to the quota of the town; and twenty-two hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the same. September 2d, W. E. Boise, Francis Bates, E. W. Shepard, and F. E. Knox were chosen to act in concert with the selectmen, to immediately fill the quota of the town; in doing which they were authorized to use the whole amount of the surplus revenue fund of the town, in the payment of bounties to men who enlist. This committee were not to charge for their services. December 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay aid to the soldiers' families. 1863. September 21st, The assessors were instructed to abate the poll-taxes of our volunteers now in the service of the United States. 1864. March 28th, One thousand dollars were appropriated to encourage enlistments and to fill the quota of the town. At a subsequent meeting the selectmen were instructed to borrow four thousand dollars for these purposes. 1865. August 16th, The selectmen were di
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
nlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen, clergymen, and all good citizens were requested to do all in their power to encourage enlistments. August 15th, The bounty was increased to two hundred dollars to three-years men, and fixed at one hundred dollars to nine-months volunteers. November 4th, The selectmen were directed to make suitable provision for the families of deceased soldiers, and for those who have been discharged for wounds or sickness. December 6th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to drafted men. The town continued to the end of the war to pay bounties and furnish aid to the families of soldiers. A number of public meetings were held to encourage recruiting. Medway furnished three hundred and sixty men for the war, which was a surplus of thirty-one over and above all demands. Thirteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
a bounty of one hundred dollars when mustered into the military service for three years and properly credited to the quota of the town. On the 20th of August another meeting was held, and a committee of nine was appointed to obtain a war fund by individual subscription. On the 8th of September the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months service and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and on the 1 6th of December the selectmen were authorized to pay the same amount of bounty to each volunteer for three years military service. 1863. At a special town-meeting held on the 28th of July, the selectmen were directed to loan to each inhabitant of Marshfield who may be drafted into the military service, or who may procure a substitute, one hundred and fifty dollars, and to take a note from each bearing interest at the rate of one mill per annum. 1864. At the annual town-meeting held on the 7th of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
ove the seats from the town hall that it may be used for drill purposes. 1862. April 28th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to families of men living in the town who had enlisted in other States. July 17th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer a bounty of one hundred dollars, and to borrow two thousand dollars to pay the same. August 23d, The bounty to three-years volunteers was raised to three hundred dollars, and a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers for nine months. December 6th, The town having a surplus of men, the selectmen were forbidden to transfer them to any other town. 1863. April 6th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of aid to the families of deceased and disabled soldiers. August 26th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. April 16th, Voted, to borrow seven thousand five hundred dollars for military purposes, and that a tax be assessed next year to repay the same. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hu