Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 8th or search for December 8th in all documents.

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th remarkable fortitude. My command has marched, climbed, slid, and swam three hundred and fifty-five miles since the eighth instant. W. W. Averill, Brigadier-General. A national account. Webster, West-Virginia, January 3. The Second, Third, and Eighth Virginia mounted infantry, Fourteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, Gibson's battalion and battery G, First Virginia artillery, composing the Mountain brigade of General Averill, left New-Creek, West-Virginia, on the morning of the eighth of December, and a march of two days brought us to Petersburgh. On the morning of the tenth, resumed the march, after being joined by detachments from the First Virginia, Fourteenth and Twenty-third Illinois infantry, a section of Rook's Illinois battery, and the Ringgold cavalry, under command of Colonel Thoburn, of the First Virginia infantry. We passed through Franklin, and camped for the night on the South-Branch. During this day's march we again destroyed the saltpetre works that the rebel
and, while the mode presented is the best the Executive can suggest, with his present impressions, it must not be understood that no other possible mode would be acceptable. Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, [seal.] the eighth day of December, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. Correspondence between Generals Longstreet and Foster. headquarters confederate forces, East-Tennessee, January 3, 1864. To the Commanding General U. S. Forces East-Tennessee: sir: I find the proclamation of President Lincoln of the eighth of December last in circulation in handbills among our soldiers. The immediate object of this circulation appears to be to induce our soldiers to quit our ranks and to take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government. I presume, however, that the great object and end in v
road. Marched out eight miles, capturing prisoners all the way. Our regiment stood picket; the rebel pickets in sight of us. They fired on the two companies on the road, so they had to be drawn back across a small creek. December sixth, about nine o'clock A. M., moved the two companies forward as advance-guard. The rebels made considerable resistance. We moved but about a mile to-day. December seventh, moved several miles past where we were encamped on the eighth of October. December eighth, moved on to Rutledge, county-seat of Grainger County. December ninth, passed through Rutledge and on to Bean's Station. Here our regiment was sent out on the Morristown road to the Holston River. Here we ran upon the rebels; had considerable skirmishing; lost one man. After dark we returned to the station. December tenth, remained at the station. December eleventh, Colonel Pennebaker, with our brigade, went to Morristown. Made no attack on the enemy, as he was about a mile
Doc. 62.-General Dana's proclamation. headquarters U. S. Forces, Texas, pass Cavallo, Jan. 30, 1864. General orders, No. 14. it is known to the world that, on the eighth day of December, ultimo, the President of the United States published a proclamation which touched the heart and inspired the tongue of every lover of liberty on the civilized earth. Its burden is pardon and liberty.--Thy sins be forgiven thee. Let the oppressed go free. Such parental care of a people has not been exhibited to the world since the patriarchal days of old — not since the Saviour of men cried to the multitude: Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. In order that the deluded and oppressed people of this State may be enlightened and informed on the subject, and may rejoice at the dawning of day from behind the black night which has surrounded them in darkness which might be felt and enabled the evil spirits to work upon them, it is directed that a
proclamation on the subject. The detail labor will, of course, have to be done by others, but I shall be greatly obliged if you will give it such general supervision as you can find consistent with your more strictly military duties. A. Lincoln. General Gillmore's order. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, South-Carolina, January 31, 1864. In accordance with the provisions of the Presidential proclamation of pardon and amnesty, given at Washington, on the eighth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in pursuance of instructions received from the President of the United States, Major John Hay, Assistant Adjutant-General, will proceed to Fernandina, Florida, and other convenient points in that State, for the purpose of extending to the citizens of the State of Florida an opportunity to avail themselves of the benefit of that proclamation, by offering for their signature the oath of allegiance therein prescrib
let, Jan. 11, 1864. sir: At daylight this morning a steamer was seen beached and burning one mile west of this inlet. Mr. O'Conner from this ship boarded her, with the loss of one man, shot under the fire from the enemy's sharp-shooters occupying riflepits on the sand-hills, which were high and near, and got her log-book, from which it appears that she is the Ranger; that she left Newcastle November eleventh, 1863, for Bermuda, where, after touching at Teneriffe, she arrived on the eighth of December; that she sailed from Bermuda January sixth, 1864, made our coast January tenth, about five miles north-east of Murrill's inlet, and landed her passengers. The next morning at daylight, intercepted by this ship, the Daylight, Governor Buckingham, and Aries, in her approach to Western bar, she was beached and fired by her crew as above mentioned. The attempts of the Governor Buckingham, aided by the Daylight and Aries, to extinguish the fire and haul the ranger off, were frustrated by