Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December 8th or search for December 8th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rate Soldiers. My good mother is the President of the Association. While I regret to leave the field of active service, I can but feel that it will be greatly to my interest to spend the winter in the hospital, where I can prosecute my studies. The army has now gone into winter-quarters, and there will probably be no movement before spring. Colonel Dougherty, who has been a wounded prisoner in our hands since the battle of Belmont, was to-day released, and returned to Cairo. Sunday, December 8th.—Arrived in Memphis yesterday. Attended service this morning at the Second Presbyterian church, and listened to an eloquent sermon by a refugee from Paducah, Kentucky. December 9th.—This evening the ladies of Memphis gave a concert for the benefit of the Southern Mothers' Association. Miss Bang, of Nashville, was the Evening Star. The Theatre was crowded, and the Southern Mothers reaped a rich harvest. December 16th.—Entered upon my duties at the hospital to-day. Read ninety<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
rate Soldiers. My good mother is the President of the Association. While I regret to leave the field of active service, I can but feel that it will be greatly to my interest to spend the winter in the hospital, where I can prosecute my studies. The army has now gone into winter-quarters, and there will probably be no movement before spring. Colonel Dougherty, who has been a wounded prisoner in our hands since the battle of Belmont, was to-day released, and returned to Cairo. Sunday, December 8th.—Arrived in Memphis yesterday. Attended service this morning at the Second Presbyterian church, and listened to an eloquent sermon by a refugee from Paducah, Kentucky. December 9th.—This evening the ladies of Memphis gave a concert for the benefit of the Southern Mothers' Association. Miss Bang, of Nashville, was the Evening Star. The Theatre was crowded, and the Southern Mothers reaped a rich harvest. December 16th.—Entered upon my duties at the hospital to-day. Read ninety<