Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for December 9th or search for December 9th in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

road to annexation was to compel the United States to consider the alternative of a European protectorate. A few years' delay enabled Texas' to make a much better bargain, and the United States reenacted the purchase of the sibylline books. It is a curious problem how a final rejection of Texas by the United States might have affected the events of the last twenty years-possibly not as the opponents of annexation would have wished. Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice-President, September 3, 1838, and they were inaugurated on the 9th of December. On December 22d General Johnston was appointed Secretary of War. Louis P. Cook was made Secretary of the Navy, and Dr. James H. Starr Secretary of the Treasury; and the Department of State was filled in rapid succession by Hon. Barnard E. Bee, Hon. James Webb, and Judge Abner S. Lipscomb; Judge Webb becoming Attorney-General. General Johnston lived on terms of great harmony and kindness with his colleagues.
ing him of the steps taken to send him supplies, etc. He adds: The most essential route to be guarded is that leading through Somerset and Monticello, as, in my opinion, most practicable for the enemy. On the same day, General Johnson wrote again, using this language: Mill Springs would seem to answer best to all the demands of the service; and from this point you may be able to observe the river, without crossing it, as far as Burkesville, which is desirable. On the 9th of December Zollicoffer informed General Johnston that he had crossed the Cumberland that day, with five infantry regiments, seven cavalry companies, and four pieces of artillery, about two-thirds of his whole force, which in all reached less than 6,000 effectives. On December 10th he wrote again: Your two dispatches of the 4th reached me late last night. I infer from yours that I should not have crossed the river, but it is now too late. My means of recrossing are so limited I could hardly