Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for December 10th or search for December 10th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A hot day on Marye's Heights. (search)
A hot day on Marye's Heights. by William Miller Owen, First Lieutenant, C. S. A. On the night of the 10th of December we, of the New Orleans Washington Artillery, sat up late in our camp on Marye's Heights, entertaining some visitors in an improvised theater, smoking our pipes, and talking of home. A final punch having been brewed and disposed of, everybody crept under the blankets and was soon in the land of Nod. In an hour or two we were aroused by the report of a heavy gun. I was up in an instant, for if there should be another it would be the signal that the enemy was preparing to cross the river. Mr. Florence, a civilian in the bivouac, bounced as if he had a concealed spring under his blanket, and cried out, Wake up! Wake up! What's that? The deep roar of the second gun was heard, and we knew what we had to do. It was 4 o'clock. Our orders were that upon the firing of these signal guns we should at once take our places in the redoubts' prepared for us on Marye's Hill,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Why Burnside did not renew the attack at Fredericksburg. (search)
l chances of success. There is a rumor and a hope that Banks may have landed on the James River; if so, a large part of the enemy's force will be diverted from this point, but if they have a force anywhere near our own in number we are pretty certain to get whipped. The letter to Judge Kirkland was much stronger and more explicit, and evoked an answer from which one paragraph is quoted: New York, December 18th, 1862. How wonderfully prophetic is your letter, written on the 10th of December. It foretells exactly the awful disaster and reverse that our cause has met with. How is it possible, if you thus knew all this, that those having control were ignorant of it? This whole transaction seems now almost incredible. To think of the thousands of splendid, brave, patriotic fellows absolutely butchered without the least beneficial result: on the contrary, with a result disgraceful and disheartening to us, but I fervently trust a result from which we can recover. This ma
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.20 (search)
about my change of plan. I will make it known at the proper time. though General Franklin and myself were on the most intimate terms, and occupied the same tent, I gave him no hint of the change. Two or three days before the movement General Franklin was notified of the point selected for his crossing, and I then told him the story of the change of plan. he merely said, your command is the strongest, and you must take the advance. as I remember, it was on the afternoon of the 10th of December that General Franklin received an order to have the head of his command at a designated point on the river, about one and a half miles below Fredericksburg, and since known as Franklin's crossing, at daylight on the morning of the 11th, where he would at once begin crossing by bridges which would be found ready. on the morning of the 11th of December, at 5 o'clock, the First Corps, under Major-General John F. Reynolds, marched to take position at the bridges, and cover the crossing o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
on, except Burns's division of the Ninth Corps. General Hooker's command was about 26,000 strong, two of General Stoneman's divisions having reported to General Franklin. These numbers aggregate 113,000. According to Burnside's return for December 10th ( Official Records, Vol. XXI., p. 1121), the present for duty equipped, or available for line of battle, was 104,903 infantry, 5884 cavalry, and 5896 artillery == 116,683. The Confederate army. Army of Northern Virginia.--General Rober M. N. Moorman. Artillery loss: k, 3; w, 22 == 25. Total Confederate loss: killed, 608; wounded, 4116; captured or missing, 653 == 5377. The present for duty in Lee's army (including all of Stuart's cavalry), as shown by his return for December 10th, was 78,513. To arrive at Lee's effective strength in the battle (not officially stated) there should be deducted the usual proportion of non-combatants, the detachment of Hampton's cavalry brigade, on a raid to the north of the Rappahannock
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Stone's River. (search)
on the same night. The forward movement had not been accomplished without some sharp fighting. The advance of Crittenden had a spirited action at La Vergne, and again at the Stewart's Creek bridge. McCook fought at Nolensville, and the cavalry, under General Stanley, found the march a continuous skirmish; but the Confederate advance pickets had fallen back upon the main line, where they rejoined their divisions. The armies were about equally matched. Bragg's effective strength on December 10th was 39,304 infantry, 10,070 cavalry, and 1758 artillery,--total, 51,132; while on December 15th General Rosecrans's returns showed a present for duty of 51,822 infantry and artillery, and 4849 cavalry,--total, 56,671. In each army these figures were diminished by the usual details for hospital and transportation service, train guards, and other purposes, so that Rosecrans reported his force actually engaged, December 31st, at 43,400, while Bragg placed his own force at 37,712. One re