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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
of operations far to the west, it was good strategy to leave him to a subordinate force, and with my main army to join Grant at Richmond. The most practicable route to Richmond was nearly a thousand miles in distance, too long for a single march; hence the necessity to reach the sea-coast for a new base. Savannah, distant three hundred miles, was the nearest point, and this distance we accomplished from November 12th to December 21st, 1864. The army reached the vicinity of Savannah, December 10th, but did not get possession of the city until the 21st.--editors. According to the Duke of Wellington, an army moves upon its belly, not upon its legs; and no army dependent on wagons can operate more than a hundred miles from its base, because the teams going and returning consume the contents of their wagons, leaving little or nothing for the maintenance of the men and animals at the front, who are fully employed in fighting; hence the necessity to forage liberally on the country, a me
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
trongly fortified position around Nashville, I remained with an effective force of only 23,053. A As shown by Colonel Mason's official report, made on the 10th of December, ten days after the battle, our effective strength was: Infantry, 18,342; artillery, 2405; cavalry, 2306,--total, 23,053. This last number, subtracted from 30,600, the strength of the army at Florence, shows a total loss from all causes of 7547, from the 6th of November to the 10th of December, which period includes the engagements at Columbia, Franklin, and of Forrest's cavalry. The enemy's estimate of our losses, as well as of the number of Confederate colors captured, is erroneoueported to be massing cavalry at Edgefield, Forrest was instructed to meet and drive them back, if they attempted to cross the Cumberland. The same day, the 10th of December, Generals Stewart and Cheatham were directed to construct detached works in rear of their flanks, which rested near the river, in order to protect these flan
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
rmy in the entire campaign did not exceed 10,000 in killed, wounded, and missing. According to official returns the effective force of Thomas's whole command was as follows: October 31st, 53,415; November 20th, 59,534; November 30th, 71,452; December 10th, 70,272. In his official report, General Thomas says that his effective force early in November consisted of the Fourth Corps, about 12,000, under General D. S. Stanley; the Twenty-third Corps, about 10,000, under General J. M. Schofield; Harmy aggregated 53,938. Exclusive of Palmer's brigade of Lee's corps, Mercer's brigade of Cheatham's corps, and Sears's and Cockrell's brigades of Stewart's corps, and Forrest's cavalry (not included in Hood's return), the present for duty on December 10th was 26,877. These omitted commands probably numbered 12,000, which would give Hood an aggregate effective force at that date of nearly 39,000. But Col. Henry Stone estimates that Hood's army at Nashville numbered 37,937, including some who