Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for December 10th or search for December 10th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
olunteer enlisting to the credit of the town, and more if necessary. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay bounties. 1863. December 1st, The town chose Nathaniel C. Fowler, Oliver Gorham, and David Matthews to co-operate with the selectmen in raising the town's quota of volunteers under the late call of the President for more men. The selectmen were authorized to draw upon the town-treasurer for such reasonable sums as they shall deem necessary for recruiting purposes. December 10th, Freeman Howes was added to the above committee. 1864. April 22d, Voted, to raise six thousand dollars, to pay each recruit who enlisted to fill the quota of the town under the last two calls of the President one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. One thousand dollars was also voted to pay bounties to men who had enlisted to the credit of the town and had received no bounty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to procure volunteers under any call which the President migh
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
tephen T. Whipple, William A. Talcott, Ezra H. Sherman; in 1862 and 1863, Stephen T. Whipple, Ezra H. Sherman, Luther H. Washburn; in 1864, Stephen T. Whipple, Jared D. Northale, William H. Meade. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was William A. Fuller. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Jedediah W. Newton; in 1864, William A. Fuller; in 1865, Charles B. Whitney. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th of December; at which the selectmen were authorized to expend such sums from the treasury as they may deem necessary for the relief of the families of volunteers, who are in the military service, and belong to Lanesborough, as the law in relation thereto provides. 1862. August 28, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist in the military service, either for three years or for nine months, and be credited to the quota of the town. 18
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
irected to enlist eighteen volunteers for nine months service, and to pay the expenses of recruits from home to camp and back, who may be rejected. On the 14th of October the town voted to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, and twelve hundred dollars to pay bounties to recruits to fill the quota of the town. 1863. A special meeting was held on the 1st of August, at which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men; and on the 10th of December the town voted to pay a bounty of three hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, provided the State will refund the same; See introductory chapter, page 14. and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 1864. A town-meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars were appropriated to reimburse citizens who had voluntarily contributed money to fill the quotas of the town. It was also to pay henceforth a bounty of one hundred and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
vided by law. 1862. July 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and ten dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. September 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eleven thousand dollars to pay these bounties. 1863. August 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow three thousand dollars for aid to the soldiers' families. December 10th, Six hundred dollars were voted for recruiting expenses, and a committee of two was chosen to aid the selectmen in obtaining volunteers. Twelve dollars a month was voted to the family of Michael Kennefield, as special relief so long as he shall remain in the United States service. Five hundred dollars were appropriated to be used by the selectmen at their discretion for the relief of soldiers' families in excess of the amount allowed by law. 1864. March 7th, Eight thousand dollars w