Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 11th or search for December 11th in all documents.

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confine myself to the movements of the grand divisions, and must refer to the reports of the Commanders for more detailed statements. The right grand division (General Sumner) was directed to concentrate near the upper and middle bridges; the left grand division (General Franklin) near the bridges below the town; the centre grand division (General Hooker) near to and in rear of General Sumner. These arrangements were made with a view to throwing the bridges on the morning of the eleventh of December. The enemy held possession of the City of Fredericksburg, and the crest or ridge running from a point on the river just above Falmouth to the Massaponax, some four miles below. This ridge was in rear of the city, forming an angle with the Rappahannock. Between the ridge and the river there is a plain, narrow at the point where Fredericksburg stands, but widening out as it approaches the Massaponax. On the north side of the river the high bluffs gave us good opportumties for placin
and were successful in developing the enemy's position. A detailed account of the results will be found in the report of Colonel Morgan, herewith forwarded. December 11. In compliance with the order of Major-General Thomas, I directed Brigadier-General Cruft to reconnoitre the enemy's position. This reconnoisance (made by a 209   Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Captain C. Haskins 1 186 187   Third Battery, Twentieth A. C. Captain Hurlbut 6 290 296 822 Total 55 2922 2977 2977 December 11. My command was increased on and after the sixth instant by the assignment of recruits arriving from the rear, amounting in the aggregate to two thousand thraveyard, the right resting on College street, and the left on the right of Colonel Harrison's brigade, where we threw up two lines of rifle-pits. On the eleventh of December made a reconnoissance by order of the General commanding, to see if enemy were still in our front. Two hundred men, under command of Colonel John A. Hotte
December 11. In compliance with the order of Major-General Thomas, I directed Brigadier-General Cruft to reconnoitre the enemy's position. This reconnoisance (made by a brigade under the command of Colonel J. G. Mitchell), owing to the whole surface of the country being covered with ice, rendering it almost impossible for men or animals to move over uneven ground, and on account of the steep slopes to be ascended in approaching the position of the enemy, was a difficult duty; but it was accomplished, and the position of the enemy developed.
December 11. My command was increased on and after the sixth instant by the assignment of recruits arriving from the rear, amounting in the aggregate to two thousand three hundred and twenty-seven enlisted men, which were properly armed and distributed to their respective battalions and brigades. The Sixty-eighth Indiana volunteers (Lieutenant-Colonel Espy, commanding) was also added. These reinforcements brought the effective strength of the division up to five thousand two hundred and forty-nine. This day orders were received, directing a reconnoissance in force upon the enemy, occupying our old line of works, near Raine's house. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding the brigade of detachments from the Fourteenth army corps, was assigned to that duty. He moved his brigade on the Murfreesboro turnpike, for about one-half mile, then made a detour to the right, where he formed his lines behind a small ridge, and sent his skirmishers to the front, drove in the skirmishers of the