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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 153 153 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 105 105 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 21 21 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource] 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 13th or search for December 13th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

ders already issued were to be superseded by new ones. It was after midnight when I returned from visiting the different commands, and before daylight of the thirteenth I prepared the following orders: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, December 13--5:55 A. M. Major-General Franklin, commanding Left Grand Division, Army of the Potomac: General Hardie will carry this despatch to you, and remain with you during the day. The General commanding directs that you keep your command in positif my staff. It reached him at 7:30 A. M. I cannot possibly give a more intelligent account of the movements of General Franklin's command that day, than by copying into this report the despatches of General Hardie, which are as follows: December 13, 7:40 A. M. General Meade's division is to make the movement from our left, but it is just reported that the enemy's skirmishers are advancing, indicating an attack upon our position on the left. 9 A. M. General Meade just moved out; Do
most impossible for men or animals to move over uneven ground, and on account of the steep slopes to be ascended in approaching the position of the enemy, was a difficult duty; but it was accomplished, and the position of the enemy developed. December 13. In obedience to the order of Major-General Thomas, a brigade of General Cruft's troops, under the command of Colonel A. G. Malloy, reconnoitred in front of my position and felt the enemy's right. The ground being still covered with smoothng been accomplished, we retired to our position in line by the direction of the Major-General commanding. This was the first time that any of my troops had skirmished with an enemy, and their conduct was entirely satisfactory. On the thirteenth of December, by order of the General commanding, I reported to Colonel Malloy, commanding brigade, provisional division, District of the Etowah, to make a reconnoissance on the east side of the N. and C. railroad, to see if the enemy was still in for
December 13. In obedience to the order of Major-General Thomas, a brigade of General Cruft's troops, under the command of Colonel A. G. Malloy, reconnoitred in front of my position and felt the enemy's right. The ground being still covered with smooth ice, rendered the movement tedious and hazardous ; but, under all the disadvantages, was skillfully executed, the enemy forced into his works, and the object of the reconnoissance accomplished. The movement was made under the immediate direction of General Cruft.
ons, and would be in command. I rather formed the idea that General Butler was actuated by a desire to witness the effect of the explosion of the powder-boat. The expedition was detained several days at Hampton Roads, awaiting the loading of the powder-boat. The importance of getting the Wilmington expedition off without delay, with or without the powder-boat, had been urged upon General Butler, and he advised to so notify Admiral Porter. The expedition finally got off on the thirteenth of December, and arrived at the place of rendezvous, off New Inlet, near Fort Fisher, on the evening of the fifteenth. Admiral Porter arrived on the evening of the eighteenth, having put in at Beaufort to get ammunition for the monitors. The sea becoming rough, making it difficult to land troops, and the supply of water and coal being about exhausted, the transport fleet put back to Beaufort to replenish; this, with the state of the weather, delayed the return to the place of rendezvous until t