Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 14th or search for December 14th in all documents.

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e in position, and we held the rich country between the Little Tennessee and the Hiawassee. The cavalry under Colonel Long passed the mountains at Telire, and proceeded about seventeen miles beyond Murphy, when Colonel Long deeming his further pursuit of the wagon train useless, he returned on the twelfth to Telire. I then ordered him and the division of General Morgan L. Smith to move to Charleston, to which I point I had previously ordered the corps of General Howard. On the fourteenth of December, all of my command on the field lay along the Hiawassee. Having communicated to General Grant the actual state of affairs, I received orders to leave on the line of the Hawassee all the cavalry and come to Chattanooga with the balance of my command. I left the brigade of cavalry, commanded by Colonel Long, reenforced by the Fifth Ohio cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Heath, the only cavalry properly belonging to the Fifteenth army corps, at Charleston, and with the remainder moved by ea
Doc. 26.-expedition to Charles City courthouse. Official despatches. Fortress Monroe, Va., Dec. 14. General Wistar, with my approbation, sent out an expedition to Charles City Court-House on the James River, to capture the enemy's force stationed there, and I have the pleasure to forward his report of its complete success. What adds to the brilliancy of its achievement is that it has been accomplished during a terrible storm. B. F. Butler, Major-General. Yorktown, Va., Dec. 14, 1863. Major-General Butler: I have the satisfaction to announce the complete success of the expedition sent out under Colonel West. All worked in successful combination. Our cavalry carried the enemy's camp at Charles City Court-House after sharp fighting — the enemy firing from their houses. We captured eight officers and eighty-two enlisted men, being the whole command of three companies, fifty-five horses and three mules, besides many shot, etc., left on the ground. The enemy's camp,
tenth, remained at the station. December eleventh, Colonel Pennebaker, with our brigade, went to Morristown. Made no attack on the enemy, as he was about a mile east of town. We returned to Bean's Station after night. December twelfth, remained at the station. December thirteenth, in the evening the enemy moved upon our pickets. Had some skirmishing. We formed line of battle, with artillery in position, to receive him, but, after some skirmishing, the rebels drew off. December fourteenth, in the evening, the enemy moved down the valley, in solid columns, upon us. Our corps was put into position; our division — Wolford's — in front, contesting every inch of ground. Our regiment was ordered to take position in the houses. The station-house is a very large brick building. Part of the regiment were in the brick and part in the wooden houses. The rebels came down the valley, through the open fields, like a flood. As there was not a twig in the way, our boys mowed them