Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 15th or search for December 15th in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 7 document sections:

by my troops, and held until they were withdrawn to to participate in the action on the fifteenth of December. December 5 and 7. By order of Major-General Thomas I directed a small brigade of coissance accomplished. The movement was made under the immediate direction of General Cruft. December 15. The weather having moderated and the ground thawed sufficiently to enable men and animalsin rejoin its command until it reached Murfreesboro, marching by way of Franklin, Tennessee. December 15. According to directions from the Major-General commanding, the division moved at four o'cThomas, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. They fell, gallantly leading their commands, on the fifteenth of December, in the assault upon the enemy's works. They held high character in the service for manvy fire from the enemy's earthworks; several men were also killed and wounded. On the fifteenth of December, by directions received by the Major-General commanding, I moved my command at six o'clo
December 3. By order of Major-General Thomas I withdrew my command from the position occupied the day previous, and placed it on a line indicated, nearer the city of Nashville, on the north side of Brown's Creek, extending from the Nolensville pike across the Murfreesboro pike, the left resting near the house of Major Lewis, a short distance from the Lebanon pike. This position was strongly fortified by my troops, and held until they were withdrawn to to participate in the action on the fifteenth of December.
December 15. The weather having moderated and the ground thawed sufficiently to enable men and animals to stand up, in obedience to the orders of Major-General Thomas, the provisional division of troops, under the command of Brigadier-General Cruft, moved at four o'clock A. M., and believed the troops of the Fourth and Twenty-third army corps, occupying their exterior line of works and picketing the front of this line from the Acklin Place to Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin and Nolensville turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. F. Miller reported his command to me at four o'clock A. M., and occupied the works from Fort Negley to the Lebanon pike, commanding the approaches to the city by the Murfreesboro, Chicken and Lebanon turnpikes. Brigadier-General J. L. Donelson reported his command at six o'clock, and occupied the works from the right of General Cruft's command to the Cumberland river, commanding the approaches to the city b
December 15. According to directions from the Major-General commanding, the division moved at four o'clock A. M., and abandoning its line of defences, relieved a portion of the troops of the Fourth army corps (Brigadier-General Wood, commanding) and Twenty-third corps, (Major-General Schofield, commanding), and held their exterior line of works-picketing also the front — from the Ackland place to a point north of Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin, Nolensville and Murfreesboro turnpikes. Details were furnished to support the batteries of artillery in the line, and to garrison Fort Mirton and redoubt Casino. The brigade of Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor (temporarily reporting to Colonel Morgan) was engaged during the day in the assault on the enemy's works near Raine's house, and was the only portion of the division in the fight. It suffered considerably in killed and wounded, and behaved creditably. The Twenty-fourth Indiana batter
ssing. aggregate. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Colonel Malloy's Brigade   4 4   7 7   6 6 17 Colonel Grosvenor's Brigade 3 25 28 5 108 113   33 33 174 Colonel Mitchell's Brigade         4 4   3 3 7   3 29 32 5 119 124   42 42 198 Among the officers killed, was Captain E. Grosvenor, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, and First Lieutenant Samuel W. Thomas, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. They fell, gallantly leading their commands, on the fifteenth of December, in the assault upon the enemy's works. They held high character in the service for manly and soldierly qualities. A lieutenant of the Second battalion, Fourteenth corps, was also killed, whose name and regiment has not yet been obtained. Among the officers wounded were Captains Benedict, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers; Henderson, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio volunteers; Brown, Twenty-seventh Ohio volunteers, and J. B. Emery, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. The number of men w
her. The enemy followed up, and commenced the establishment of his line in front of Nashville on the second of December. As soon as it was ascertained that Hood was crossing the Tennessee river, and that Price was going out of Missouri, General Rosecrans was ordered to send to General Thomas the troops of General A. J. Smith's command, and such other troops as he could spare. The advance of this reinforcement reached Nashville on the thirtieth of November. On the morning of the fifteenth December General Thomas attacked Hood in position, and, in a battle lasting two days, defeated and drove him from the field in the utmost confusion, leaving in our hands most of his artillery and many thousand prisoners, including four general officers. Before the battle of Nashville I grew very impatient over, as it appeared to me, the unnecessary delay. This impatience was increased upon learning that the enemy had sent a force of cavalry across the Cumberland into Kentucky. I feared Hoo
The exact figures were only obtained, however, on the reoccupation of Franklin by our forces, after the battles of December fifteen and sixteen, at Brentwood Hills. near Nashville, and are given as follows: Buried upon the field, one thousand seveunchanged, and with the exception of occasional picket firing, nothing of importance occurred from the third to the fifteenth December. In the meanwhile I was preparing to take the offensive without delay; the cavalry was being remounted under the d commence operations at six A. M. on the fifteenth, or as soon thereafter as practicable. On the morning of the fifteenth December, the weather being favorable, the army was formed and ready at an early hour to carry out the plan of battle promul the last blow of the campaign, at a distance of over two hundred miles from where we first struck the enemy on the fifteenth December, near Nashville. To all my sub-commanders (Major-Generals Schofield, Stanley, Rousseau, Steedman, Smith, and Wil