Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for December 15th or search for December 15th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
r special meeting was held, at which the town voted to pay any of its citizens a bounty of one hundred dollars upon enlistment for nine months service, and a further sum of one hundred dollars when regularly discharged. Six immediately enlisted, each of whom served his full time. October 13th, The selectmen were authorized to enlist men in other places, if a sufficient number could not be obtained in Falmouth; but in no case to pay any higher bounty than that paid to our own citizens. December 15th, The town bounty to each volunteer was fixed at two hundred dollars. 1863. A special meeting was held on the 21st of December, when the selectmen were authorized to draw on the towntreasurer for such expenses as may be incurred in procuring the town's quota of volunteers; and they were instructed to proceed forthwith to procure the men required. 1864. April—, The selectmen were directed to procure the number of men required, or which may be required, under any order of the Preside
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
t Phenix in Fairhaven, and Fort Taber in New Bedford, mounting eleven guns, had been manned by the Home Guard, and recommending an additional appropriation to maintain the same; and on the 29th of July five thousand dollars were appropriated. September 5th, The mayor was authorized to organize one or more companies for the national army, the bounty to each member not to exceed fifteen dollars. November 20th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. December 15th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of soldiers' bounties. 1862. January 3d, A report was made that three companies of volunteers for three years military service had been organized. January 4th, This being the close of the municipal year, a report and resolution complimentary of the outgoing mayor, Hon. Isaac C. Taber, were unanimously adopted. July 10th, Seven thousand five hundred dollars were appropriated to establish a General Hospital for sick and wounded
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
five dollars. The town-clerk was directed to place upon the records of the town the name of every inhabitant of the town who had already enlisted, and who might thereafter enlist, with the name of the regiment to which he belonged and date of muster into the same. August 16th, The town voted to give a bounty of two hundred dollars to nine-months volunteers, and the selectmen were asked to use all proper exertions to have the quota of the town filled in ten days, which was accomplished. December 15th, The selectmen were authorized to pay such bounties as they might think reasonable for volunteers to fill the contingent of the town under the recent call of the President for three hundred thousand men, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the amount of money required for the purpose. 1864. April 4th, The town voted sixteen hundred dollars for recruiting purposes. July 29th, Voted, to raise five thousand dollars for bounties to volunteers and expenses for recruiting, provided
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
a bounty of one hundred dollars when mustered in for three years service, and to the five men who shall enlist first an additional sum of five dollars. August 25th, The same bounty was authorized to be paid to nine-months volunteers. 1863. December 15th, Voted, to pay to each raw recruit fifteen dollars, and to each veteran recruit twenty-five dollars, who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town in addition to all other bounties. 1864. April 11th, The bounty re the 15th of the month; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. August 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for nine months service to fill the quota of the town. December 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to volunteers who enlist for three years and are credited to the quota of Mattapoisett. Thomas Nelson was appointed special recruiting agent for the town. 1863 and 1864. The author
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
eer for nine months service when credited to the quota of the town, provided said quota shall be filled by volunteers. Voted, that the selectmen be instructed to act liberally in the matter of paying State aid to the families of volunteers. December 15th, Voted, to pay two hundred dollars to each of the three-years men called for to fill the balance of the quota of nine-months men for Hardwick. 1864. April 4th, Voted, that the selectmen be authorized to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollpaid when mustered in and credited to the quota of the city. August 27th, The same bounty was ordered to be paid to volunteers in the nine-months service. Fifty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same, and for war contingencies. December 15th, The order to pay bounties to more nine-months men was rescinded. The payment to volunteers for three years service was continued. 1863. January 26th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families an