Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for December 19th or search for December 19th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
listed to fill the quota of the town under the last two calls of the President one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. One thousand dollars was also voted to pay bounties to men who had enlisted to the credit of the town and had received no bounty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to procure volunteers under any call which the President might issue. August 6th, The selectmen were authorized to deposit fifteen hundred dollars with the State treasurer to procure recruits. December 19th, Voted, that the selectmen be authorized to procure recruits in anticipation of a call for five hundred thousand men. Yarmouth must have furnished about two hundred and fifty men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands, none of whom were commissioned officers in the military service. There were fifteen who were volunteer officers in the navy, and three of the principal pilots on the South-Carolina coast were citizens of Yarmouth. The whole amount of mone
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
orize the selectmen to pledge the credit of the town to any amount that may be necessary, to pay to each volunteer soldier required of this town, under the late call of the President for 300,000 nine-months men, the sum of three hundred dollars. Under this vote, nine men enlisted, and each received a bounty of three hundred dollars. November 4th, The selectmen were instructed to furnish aid to the families of volunteers from Alford in the United-States military service. 1863. On the 19th of December a town-meeting was held, and Ezra C. Ticknor was appointed to be an agent to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town. He enlisted two men, to each of whom was paid a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1864. April 7th, The town voted, to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer to the extent of its quota under the late call of the President for 200,000 men. Under this vote, no volunteer was procured; but nine men were drafted, each of whom paid t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
rs bounty to each of the forty men enlisted in the new company for nine months service, to be paid when mustered in; and the selectmen were authorized to borrow the money for that purpose. December 13th, Ira Gerry, Amos Hill, 2d, L. F. Lynde, George Cowdrey, and John Hill, were chosen to enlist volunteers necessary to fill the quota of the town, and to pay such bounties as in their judgment may be for the best interest of the town; the town-treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. December 19th, The above committee reported that no further recruiting would be necessary at present, as they had ascertained at headquarters that Stoneham had already furnished sixty-two men more than its proportion. 1863. November 3d, Voted, to petition the Governor to call an extra session of the Legislature; John Hill, John Kingman, Levi S. Rowe, George W. Dike, and L. F. Lynde were appointed to pursue such a course as they think for the best, to carry the foregoing vote into effect. 1864. A
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
lectmen were directed to continue the payment of aid to the families of deceased and disabled soldiers. August 26th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. April 16th, Voted, to borrow seven thousand five hundred dollars for military purposes, and that a tax be assessed next year to repay the same. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years, and to borrow five thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars. December 19th, The same amount of bounty was continued, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow four thousand two hundred and fifty dollars. Blackstone furnished seven hundred and twenty men for the war, of whom two hundred and ten enlisted in Rhode Island regiments, and were therefore not credited to the quota of the town; notwithstanding this Blackstone filled all demands made upon it by the Government, and had a surplus of thirty-seven men at the end of the war. Ten were commissioned officers