Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 21st or search for December 21st in all documents.

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Doc. 25.-General Averill's expedition. Official report. Edray, Pocahontas Co., W. Va., Dec. 21, via Beverley, Dec. 22, 1868. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: I have the honor to report that I cut the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad at Salem on the sixteenth instant, and have arrived safely at this point with my command, consisting of the Second, Third, and Eighth Virginia mounted infantry, Fourteenth Pennsylvania, Dobson's battalion of cavalry, and Ewing's battery, at Salem. Three depots were destroyed, containing two thousand barrels of flour, ten thousand bushels of wheat, one hundred thousand bushels shelled corn, fifty thousand bushels oats, two thousand barrels meat, several cords of leather, one thousand sacks of salt, thirty-one boxes clothing, twenty bales of cotton, a large amount of harness, shoes, and saddles, equipments, tools, oil, tar, and various other stores, and one hundred wagons. The telegraph wire was cut, coiled, and burned for half
Doc. 28.-expedition through Page Valley, Virginia. headquarters, December 28, 1863. On Monday morning, December twenty-first, the First Maine cavalry, with the Second, Eighth, and Sixteenth Pennsylvania cavalry regiments, assembled at Bealton Station, on the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, preparatory to their departure for Page Valley, Perryville, and the cosy little town of Luray. It was the intention of Colonel Charles H. Smith, of the First Maine cavalry, who commanded the expedition, to start at daylight, but owing to two of the regiments having returned to camp from a tedious campaign of three days only the preceding evening, a delay of a few hours was necessary to replenish exhausted stores of forage, ammunition, and subsistence. At eleven o'clock A. M., every thing being in readiness, the four regiments took up their line of march for Sulphur Springs. After a short halt, the line was formed, and the bugle-notes echoed: Advance. A march of a few hou